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Are There Any Raspberry Pi 2 Benchmarks You'd Like To See?

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  • Are There Any Raspberry Pi 2 Benchmarks You'd Like To See?

    Phoronix: Are There Any Raspberry Pi 2 Benchmarks You'd Like To See?

    While the level of performance out of the Raspberry Pi devices have had me less than interested, I decided to finally pick up a Raspberry Pi 2 anyways for some benchmarking and testing of the VC4 DRM+Gallium3D driver stack...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...i-2-Benchmarks

  • #2
    When it's used to control stuff, latency can be an issue rather than bandwidth, so graphics/compute stuff is not interesting but small file random access is. Power consumption is also of interest. During development of low level interfacing it can be convenient to alternate between a VM and native host so general benchmarks on a VM indicating usability would be interesting.

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    • #3
      The only RPi benchmarks I'm interested in seeing are the performance of the OSS graphics when it's available, and the performance of I/O access on the SD card. Not sure how you'd do the latter, maybe it'd be interesting to see how it's affected by different SD cards?

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      • #4
        Yes, the RPi, if anything, is very overpowered for most applications. They provide about as much performance as a laptop from 15 years ago, at 1/50 the cost and energy consumption. That additional capability lets it run a full desktop distribution, which makes embedded development very easy. The "benchmark" in this case is low cost, low power. There are certainly lower cost options like the ESP8266, but you give up the ability to run a full desktop distro with 30,000 off-the shelf packages.

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        • #5
          I would like to some GPU benchmarks in comparion with Intel HD 2000 or some android consoles or something like than.
          Otherwise i would like to see Rapsberry, Banana, Orange comparision.

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          • #6
            It would be nice to see Open Arena benchmarks as the VC4 driver progresses. I'm also interested to see what, if any, difference 2d OpenGL makes over x11 in MPlayer.

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            • #7
              While the write speed is apparently "stable" (15-18MByte/s) from one micro-SD to another, I noticed a large change of behaviour for example with a "dist-upgrade" where higher-end SDs are much quicker. This may be related to writing a lot of small (configuration) files under linux. But it is worth investigating.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by leiptrstormr View Post
                I'm also interested to see what, if any, difference 2d OpenGL makes over x11 in MPlayer.
                The difference is *huge*. With mpv (should be the same in MPlayer), I can only downscale with x11, any kind of upscaling will result in a slideshow instead of smooth video. That swscale doesn't have any neon optimizations makes the difference even bigger than it could be. Of course with mpv one can simply use its native RPi support, both hardware decoding (--hwdec=rpi) and presentation (--vo=rpi)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
                  Yes, the RPi, if anything, is very overpowered for most applications.
                  I would rather say they just have utterly crappy power management. Even cheap chinese tablets CPUs can at least downclock like an order of magnitude, reducing voltage as well. This makes them cold and low-power during system being idle. But Pi uses some odd broadcom crap. It initially targeted DVD players or so, and so it does not cares about power management even a bit. Needless to say it is "owerpowered" in terms of consumed power.

                  But in no way it is overpowered in terms of, say, network. IIRC there is sill no native Ethernet, and usb-based Ethernet is, obviously, not great. Shame on Broadcom, $5 allwinner ICs are doing native gigabit these days.

                  Then it's not like Pi is good when it comes to storage. SD card and USB is all you get. So you would have hard time to complain it is too fast :P.

                  ...so Pi would be, say, very crappy microserver. One can get MUCH better device for comparable price. It is also bad choice for installations where power consumption matters or where you want to have proper back-up power supply. Other boards allow to hook LiIon battery to their power manager IC output and it would handle charging, etc and automatically switch to battery, just like tablets and phones do. But for Pi it is still kinda troublesome, they can't get adequate power management. So their real achievement is marketing. But their engineering is rather varies from mediocre to crappy and easily loses to cheap chinese boards these days.

                  They provide about as much performance as a laptop from 15 years ago, at 1/50 the cost and energy consumption.
                  Still, quite a power hungry device and it can be like an order of magnitude better, especially if system is idle most of time. Everything related to power circuitry and power management is clearly not what RPi creators can consider as achievement. Actually most of comparable boards would have much better power management. Isn't it a shame cheap Chinese copy-pasters pwn these made-in-uk nuts and heavy-weight broadcom monster in terms of engineering? Welcome to XXI century! XD

                  That additional capability lets it run a full desktop distribution, which makes embedded development very easy. The "benchmark" in this case is low cost, low power. There are certainly lower cost options like the ESP8266, but you give up the ability to run a full desktop distro with 30,000 off-the shelf packages.
                  Uhm, ESP8266 requires to deal with custom tool chain, unusual OS and other weird crap. Not to mention it is not compatible with anything else and you hit 100% vendor lock. Once you deploy some projects... what if Espressif would decide to, say, increase prices? Right: you already put your bet on it and can't easily migrate to another device. This is much easier with devices similar to Pi, which ensures there going to be decent competition, power and features would improve, while prices would tend to go down, etc. Not to mention Linux gives a shitload of options. I'm even scared to imagine how one supposed to implement web interface on ESPs. And on Linux ARM I can basically install usual httpd of my choice and do what I need. Obviously it is better to go for more or less lightweight one, like lighttpd, nginx, or even something like thttpd or openwrt's httpd, rather than slow and resource-hogging Apache. Not to mention it is kinda wrong idea to trust wireless security to some proprietary wireless stack. And wireless as method of communication is a really fragile thing, so it is unacceptable in places where inability to communicate with device can cause troubles. Generally speaking, it is really easy to send specific packets, bringing all wi-fi activity within transmitter's range to almost complete halt.

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                  • #10
                    I'd like to see general purpose benchmarks, such as:
                    - btrfs performance uncompressed, lzo, gzip
                    - ext4 encryption/unencrypted performance
                    - video decoding or game performance with/without gpu
                    - temperature, power consumption and other usual linux benchmarks

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