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The Increasing Rate Of Linux News; Only 39% Of Site Traffic Is From Linux Desktops

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  • #31
    im curious, can you break down firefox/chome on the os level
    eg linux desktop X% for firefox, Y% for chrome/chromium, same for windows

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    • #32
      Originally posted by marceel View Post
      Same here. You won't spent your free time at home reading phoronix. You have to do it at work.
      Yepp!

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      • #33
        Originally posted by GraysonPeddie View Post
        I have been Windows-free since November 2012. Before that, I used to dual-boot between Windows and Linux after I change motherboard and I don't want to pay for Windows ever again just to reactivate. I am very price-conscious and OEM is cheaper than retail version of Windows.

        Sorry, Microsoft, You already have enough cash cow for now... But then I really want to play games made for Windows and I don't want to bother afford one, so what can I do? (sigh) Ugh... Forget about Windows games. And forget about WINE as well. I've been trying to get surround sound working through PulseAudio and HDMI, but when playing Portal 2, I don't get to hear Cave Johnson speaking from behind me. Portal games for Linux only support stereo.

        Windows 10 is a boring operating system anyway if I build a machine specifically for gaming. I suppose I can get back Aero Glass (Glass8?) and Classic Shell and only create a local account, but why bother? And why bother with OneDrive and all the Microsoft services, including Cortana that I don't care at all? And why should I care about DirectX 12 that M$ boasted so much? And last but not least, why bother activating Windows at all? To prevent piracy? Pffft. You can't stop piracy, M$. No matter how hard you try and I hate having Windows being tied specifically to a motherboard once I activate.

        All and all, I feel so much happier with Linux and I am currently using GNOME 3 as my desktop environment of choice. And I want to pay to play games and I am very happy with that; so long as I can play games in any platform of choice.
        As long as you bought a copy at retail, All MS software that a consumer purchases uses transferable licenses, and the way it usually works is that after a certain amount of time (usually a month) a license may be installed onto a different machine. If that doesn't work, then you can call MS tech support and they'll reset the license allowing you to install it on another machine. As to why? well it's a policy that came in during the start of the DRM wars, I expect the point was to stop the behavior of purchasing a single license and then using that on multiple machines so that Microsoft could cause them to pay more, as opposed to targeting actual "Pirates".

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        • #34
          Originally posted by edmon View Post
          in the end, did you use Windows at home ot at work? i mostly understand if you use it at work, but i can't understand why someone will use windows at home?
          Obviously one reason to use Windows is games. But considering the amount of recent games that start to work now on linux; this is no longer a strong argument.

          Another home-use-case is photography. If you want to do something remotely serious you'll end up with Adobe et.al. And this leaves a lot to be desired on linux (under wine)

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post

            As long as you bought a copy at retail, All MS software that a consumer purchases uses transferable licenses, and the way it usually works is that after a certain amount of time (usually a month) a license may be installed onto a different machine. If that doesn't work, then you can call MS tech support and they'll reset the license allowing you to install it on another machine. As to why? well it's a policy that came in during the start of the DRM wars, I expect the point was to stop the behavior of purchasing a single license and then using that on multiple machines so that Microsoft could cause them to pay more, as opposed to targeting actual "Pirates".
            So obviously, I think it's cheaper to go retail instead of going OEM; however, the retail version of Windows 7 may not be worth it if extended support (security updates) expire around 2020. But then wouldn't game developers port the games such as Fallout/Fallout 2/Fallout 3, Time Rifters, Antichamber, The Last Remnant, and a couple of others to SteamOS/Linux before the year 2020?

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            • #36
              Originally posted by GraysonPeddie View Post
              So obviously, I think it's cheaper to go retail instead of going OEM; however, the retail version of Windows 7 may not be worth it if extended support (security updates) expire around 2020. But then wouldn't game developers port the games such as Fallout/Fallout 2/Fallout 3, Time Rifters, Antichamber, The Last Remnant, and a couple of others to SteamOS/Linux before the year 2020?
              Well basically you have to not buy a PC from an OEM (HP, Dell, and the like) in order to transfer licenses, you can use the "OEM version" you can get from newegg and such.

              As to porting those games, It is possible, but Bethseda will need to decide to support SteamOS/Linux for their games (which as of yet they haven't), and the others are going to be hit and miss because you're dealing with indie developers. A lot is going to be dependent on how Valve does things. I'm optimistic as to where things will stand, but I don't think we'll be at the "Everything is ported" state by that point.

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