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What Windows 10 vs. Linux Benchmarks Would You Like To See?

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  • #41
    Originally posted by Master5000 View Post
    Benchmarking is pointless. Windows has won. Yet again. I already have Windows 10 and it's the best OS ever. Way better than Windows 8.1 and waaaay above anything the Linux amateurs have ever done. Well done Microsoft!
    Are you out of your mind, Linux rules you've said that because you haven't tried it yet, I do recommend to check it out maybe openSUSE or WattOS just to begin you will see the difference between Closed and Open System, but it ain't just that my dear friend, many more are out there, so please Phoronix Check it out and show us how well Linux do

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    • #42
      x265/HEVC encoding(one pass, and 2 or more passes). Decoding as well
      VP9 encoding(one pass, and 2 or more passes). Decoding as well.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by Master5000 View Post
        Benchmarking is pointless. Windows has won. Yet again. I already have Windows 10 and it's the best OS ever. Way better than Windows 8.1 and waaaay above anything the Linux amateurs have ever done. Well done Microsoft!
        Sort of a waste trolling a website full of people that are mostly well-acquainted with multiple platforms including Windows. You need an easily butthurt audience with those skills. Maybe try the FSF.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by humbug View Post
          I think the problem is low RAM usage doesn't indicate good optimization. A lot of people are too obsessed with it.
          Windows will cache a lot of non-critical stuff into RAM but that doesn't mean it's heavy. It will unload that stuff if another application requires the RAM.
          Actually on Vista at least I remember reading a few articles about the memory manager / virtual memory system. One would expect that when Windows (or any sane operatingsystem) loads stuff from disk and stores it in a cache it would simply drop the cache if it needs the memory for other stuff. On Windows (vista at least) I read that the virtual memory system is not exactly up to date and can end up paging (swapping) out part of the cache to disk. Unless the paging (swap) file is on seriously fast (and separate) storage I can't possibly see any benefit from doing that with the exception that the data can be read in serialized. You might as well read the original data from disc again.

          I am curious to if this is fixed... I used (shrug) Windows XP at work and it performed quite well actually. After "up"grading to Windows 7 on the exact same hardware everything is dead slow (regardless of any tweaks) and for some reason everybody is claiming that Windows 7 is fast. I ponder if the above have been fixed. But generally using RAM for something is always better and faster than using it for nothing so I could not agree more with your comment there. Too many do not understand the benefit of caching stuff, but if what I wrote is actually true then it do understand why people think using less ram is a good thing

          http://www.dirtcellar.net

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          • #45
            Initial Windows 10 benchmarks vs. Fedora Linux - http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...iris6200&num=1
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #46
              Shadow of Mordor benchmarks between different platforms

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              • #47
                I'll second the disk I/O benchmarks - I've often heard it said that Windows has much slower file access than Linux (e.g. cmake has a cache that is only used in Windows for this reason), so it would be interesting to see if Win10 improves on this and how it compares to Linux (with both NTFS and ext4 tested under Linux).

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