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The Quest Of Finding Linux Compatible Hardware

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  • phoronix
    started a topic The Quest Of Finding Linux Compatible Hardware

    The Quest Of Finding Linux Compatible Hardware

    Phoronix: The Quest Of Finding Linux Compatible Hardware

    While Intel is often looked at as being the most Linux and open-source friendly company among the major IHVs, as shown today in Intel's Linux Sandy Bridge Graphics Still Troubling, even in 2011 there are still serious Linux hardware issues to overcome. The Linux hardware support has a much better foundation than where it was at in 2004 when I founded Phoronix, and for hardware that's been in the marketplace for a few months old these problems quickly go away, but for new adopters it's the biggest challenge...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=OTAyNA

  • squirrl
    replied
    Hardware

    There is no excuse for the constant changes that are made to the programming interfaces. My ATI driver should work no matter what version they increase the XServer to.

    How many times can they sit and keep saying it was the wrong design. What are all the conferences for? Can't Xorg and Kernel settle on one way to program a driver?

    initialize( *pointer, char **, null );

    For Pete's sake, (good song btw).

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Thetargos View Post
    This is all incredible and good, what would make it even better would be to somehow link this to smolt so you could actually see how the hardware plays in a given context of hardware combinations.

    Hmm? Not sure that there is anything that Smolt does that OpenBenchmarking.org doesn't or can't do and in a much more usable/friendly way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thetargos
    replied
    This is all incredible and good, what would make it even better would be to somehow link this to smolt so you could actually see how the hardware plays in a given context of hardware combinations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Svartalf
    replied
    Originally posted by apexwm View Post
    In regards to graphics cards, stick with nVidia which has excellent support.
    And your remarks are why we need such a database of support. Not all NVidia parts have "excellent support". If you buy a laptop with Optimus tech in it, you'll get nothing but the Intel GPU supported for that machine...ever... That's something with NVidia. It's about the same story as the X300 Mobile parts that ATI fielded. Big fat joke for Linux.

    There is both a proprietary and open source driver available.
    Whoo... That's a completely accurate statement, and abjectly worthless to most people looking for answers for Linux graphics support.

    1) Neither driver supports Optimus technology GPUs.
    2) The FOSS driver doesn't support everything and is still quite in it's infancy.
    3) While the closed driver works well in many cases, it can still give you fits when it does things an application doesn't expect from it- and it's had issues from time to time.

    Stay away from ATI which has a long history of issues with Linux.
    That's a mixed bag, really. Back when Doom3 came out, it was a bit of a push. For some configurations, it worked well. I know, I had a high-end ATI card with a dual screen setup for work when I was doing stock market software. There was some variablility in things over release versions and each person has their pet-peeve on the driver (streaming video being one of the more consistent ones for most people...).

    It should be noted that the FOSS drivers for AMD are actually in better shape and perform well with more stuff than the NVidia ones. And, moreover, ATI gave out info freely to the Linux community back as far back as the Rage PRO. I know, I have some of that info from when I was doing Utah-GLX work. Same with the Rage128. It was when they went to the Radeon that the lawyers and that sort got in the way of things and cut us off for that long period before we got info and help again from them.

    So...your info's not quite as good as you think of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • apexwm
    replied
    A little exaggerated

    I've been a sys admin using Linux for over 13 years, and I've VERY seldom encountered hardware that was not supported, and I've dealt with countless name brand workstation and server machines. If you are building your own systems as I think this article implies, then yes you will come across problems. But most users are probably purchasing systems from vendors like HP, Acer, Dell, etc. In that case, you have a very good chance of everything just working since there are a LOT of users out there testing the same systems. There are many more variables when you are building your system from scratch, not every single device can be tested.

    In regards to graphics cards, stick with nVidia which has excellent support. There is both a proprietary and open source driver available. Stay away from ATI which has a long history of issues with Linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • ?John?
    replied
    Originally posted by Yfrwlf View Post
    If you don't care about standards as I do so be it, but standards and openness give you more options and empower you and the community, so those kinds of things are better to support.
    Oh, man! I've just been talking about this with one of my clients. Took the words right out of my mouth. Open standards are the guarantee of freedom. Right now, that freedom comes at a cost not everyone is willing to pay, but they're definitely the best way to go in the long run.

    Leave a comment:


  • ?John?
    replied
    You rock!

    There's only one thing I can think of to properly describe what you're talking about:
    FUCKING AWESOME!

    Leave a comment:


  • curaga
    replied
    This will be very interesting

    For example I would like to find out what's the 1Gbit ethernet card with lowest cpu usage in network-heavy tests. And then the same divided by card price (or would that be better multiplied?).

    Leave a comment:


  • coats
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    The quest for Linux-compatible hardware is actually quite simple:

    * Get any sound card except X-Fi.
    * Get an NVidia graphics card.

    That's all there is to it
    I call BS: My graphics server at work is using an nVidia Quadro NVS 420,
    Mandriva 2010.0 PowerPack, and a Dell 3008WFP monitor running at 2560x1600
    physical / 3200x2400 virtual.

    It REFUSES to respect the virtual screen size, and I have to jump through
    hoops to make any of the window managers usable because of that failure.
    I have not had that trouble with any previous graphics card, counting
    nine different machines, four different video-card vendors, and many releases
    of RedHat, Krud, Fedora, CentOS, SuSE, and Mandriva over the last fifteen
    years.

    And don't tell me not to use virtual: for the kind of work I do (very high res GIS),
    I need all the screen area I can get.

    Leave a comment:

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