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Direct3D 8 Support "D8VK" Merged Into DXVK

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  • Direct3D 8 Support "D8VK" Merged Into DXVK

    Phoronix: Direct3D 8 Support "D8VK" Merged Into DXVK

    Direct3D 8 support by way of the D8VK project has now been merged into DXVK, the widely relied upon open-source software for mapping Direct3D 9/10/11 atop Vulkan that is used by Valve's Steam Play (Proton) for enjoying Windows games on Linux...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Phoronix: Direct3D 8 Support "D8VK" Merged Into DXVK

    Direct3D 8 support by way of the D8VK project has now been merged into DXVK, the widely relied upon open-source software for mapping Direct3D 9/10/11 atop Vulkan that is used by Valve's Steam Play (Proton) for enjoying Windows games on Linux...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Direct3D-8-D8VK-In-DXVK
    Partially on topic, because it does use Direct3D, only an even older version than v8 from the Win95 days (v2 or 3 I'd guess without looking), I have a game that will "run" on top of Wine, but effectively unplayable because of some weird metrics it does on weapon ranges. It's called "Total Annihilation" and was one of my favorite games back in 1997-98. The effects of the behavior is that the computer player can effectively shoot from one end of the map to the other with practically unlimited range. I was wondering wth was going on when it started happening, then once I figured out what was happening turned to vaguely amused when I figured out there's apparently some kind of range metrics from the DOS/95/98 era that's still present and working in NT's descendants but apparently not working correctly in Wine.

    Regardless, that's one of the games I have that Wine can't handle, and I've never tried with Proton for two reasons: it's not a Steam game which makes it problematical to try to get Steam to manage it + run it on Proton, and two... I quit installing Steam a couple of years ago on Linux because I didn't like the way Steam just dumps all files for a game on the filesystem with full permissions. While it's not a high security risk as a practical matter (for me and my personal system), it's bad behavior/awful security on any Unix system to purposely bypass the basic security system for the sake of convenience.

    Soooooo.... that just means Windows keeps a presence on my computers as a dual boot setup just for those quirky games that have neither a Linux native build or don't meet the "platinum" standard for Wine functionality.

    FWIW, if you're interested you can still buy TA on GOG.com. Works fine on modern Windows, although on very high resolution screens running native res. you will have to squint - it was designed for SVGA monitors back in the mid 90s. May or may not work on Windows in a guest VM, never tried.

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    • #3
      according dxvk is a big part for approve dxvk 2.4 (maybe stay closer)

      see nice d3d8.dll size around 1.6mb




      some examples:

      rise of nations gold solve texture issues



      stolen



      Lotr Rotk



      billy hatcher (in my case this game with before d8vk version have a heavy stutters but now stay ok)



      Last edited by pinguinpc; 07 July 2024, 04:04 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
        Regardless, that's one of the games I have that Wine can't handle, and I've never tried with Proton for two reasons: it's not a Steam game which makes it problematical to try to get Steam to manage it + run it on Proton, and two... I quit installing Steam a couple of years ago on Linux because I didn't like the way Steam just dumps all files for a game on the filesystem with full permissions. While it's not a high security risk as a practical matter (for me and my personal system), it's bad behavior/awful security on any Unix system to purposely bypass the basic security system for the sake of convenience.
        1. Build Proton as a standalone Wine. Using plain or staging Wine you are missing tons of game specific patches and improvements. If you are using normal distro you can use something like https://github.com/Frogging-Family/wine-tkg-git to make ideal Wine build.
        2. Use Steam to run a game as external application. I don't know who told you Steam is not safe. Steam uses bubblewrap in its runtime to sandbox games from system https://github.com/ValveSoftware/ste...d_userns_clone. You can even use Flatpak for additional sandbox isolation if you are so concerned about security. I hope you never do sudo wine?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
          Partially on topic, because it does use Direct3D, only an even older version than v8 from the Win95 days (v2 or 3 I'd guess without looking), I have a game that will "run" on top of Wine, but effectively unplayable because of some weird metrics it does on weapon ranges. It's called "Total Annihilation" and was one of my favorite games back in 1997-98. The effects of the behavior is that the computer player can effectively shoot from one end of the map to the other with practically unlimited range. I was wondering wth was going on when it started happening, then once I figured out what was happening turned to vaguely amused when I figured out there's apparently some kind of range metrics from the DOS/95/98 era that's still present and working in NT's descendants but apparently not working correctly in Wine.
          I can't see any other references to this weapon range issue online, but if it still exists perhaps there's now a patch for it. Here's a guide for getting the game set up on Linux:

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          • #6
            insert "we need all the DX" meme here.

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            • #7
              Does it really make sense to translate even lower versions than directx8 to Vulkan?

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              • #8
                Finally, Morrowind with native gpu performance... :P''

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bemerk View Post
                  Does it really make sense to translate even lower versions than directx8 to Vulkan?
                  At least on Windows, this allows DX8 games that are limited to 30-60 fps to use AMD AFMF or Lossless Scaling Frame Gen to interpolate 2x to 3x the fps. So 30 to 90 or 60 to 180 fps for example.
                  Last edited by Cryio; 07 July 2024, 05:10 PM.

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                  • #10
                    While not relevant anymore in the grand scheme of things, while DirectX 8.x had a lifespan of 2 years, between 2000 to 2002, until it got replaced by DirectX 9.0 and full pixel shaders, due to the fact 6th gen consoles were consisting of Playstation 2 (no Pixel Shaders), GameCube (no Pixel Shaders) and Xbox (theoretically DX8.1 support with Pixel Shader 1.4), most 6th gen games that also released on PC had a DirectX8.0 codepath up until around ~2007.

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