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GStreamer 1.22 Released With Improved AV1 Support, Better WebRTC & AMD AMF Additions

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  • GStreamer 1.22 Released With Improved AV1 Support, Better WebRTC & AMD AMF Additions

    Phoronix: GStreamer 1.22 Released With Improved AV1 Support, Better WebRTC & AMD AMF Additions

    GStreamer 1.22 is out today as the first major release of 2023 for this open-source multimedia framework. With GStreamer 1.22 comes some exciting feature additions...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/GStreamer-1.22-Released

  • #2
    Wow, nice! Happy New Year!

    Comment


    • #3
      Cool, but how does this compare with FFmpeg library or PipeWire.
      I understand that all should work with video streams but how, what are the main differences?

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow, 2023 is the Year of AV1!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
          Cool, but how does this compare with FFmpeg library or PipeWire.
          I understand that all should work with video streams but how, what are the main differences?
          It serves a different purpose.

          FFmpeg is a codec library. PipeWire is a media stream routing infrastructure. GStreamer is an application API.

          There is some overlap of course, but the main idea is that GStreamer can (and sometimes does) use FFmpeg to decode/encode audio and video streams, and relies on PipeWire to send them to the right targets.

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          • #6
            WebRTC support sounds nice

            Comment


            • #7
              ahh gstreamer, how you make me want to bash my head off of a wall

              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              Cool, but how does this compare with FFmpeg library or PipeWire.
              I understand that all should work with video streams but how, what are the main differences?
              different audiences, gstreamer is generally easier to work with then something like ffmpeg, both are good for working with audio and video, but gstreamer is easier to make do a large variety of tasks, so if you need something more simple, or more flexible then ffmpeg, you want to go with gstreamer. if you want finegrained control over the encode, decode, muxing and demuxing process, you want to use ffmpeg

              pipewire is a system api for connecting applications and hardware's audio and video interfaces together.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
                Cool, but how does this compare with FFmpeg library or PipeWire.
                I understand that all should work with video streams but how, what are the main differences?
                The simplest way to explain their roles is:
                • FFmpeg is a library of codecs, providing the implementations for the majority of the formats supported
                • GStreamer is a plugin framework which, among other things, allowed people to add an H.265 plugin to their distro without having to upgrade everything. (Think of it as Microsoft DirectShow. Just because the ffdshow codec pack exists doesn't mean DirectShow is unnecessary.)
                • PipeWire is an A/V router... essentially, a patch bay that lets you choose which inputs feed into your GStreamer/FFmpeg support for audio/video encoding and which outputs its support for audio/video playback should wind up in.
                ...or, to put it another way:
                • FFmpeg decodes your MP3 file
                • GStreamer avoids the need for your player program to be built against a specific FFmpeg and for that specific FFmpeg to support every format and input/output API you want to use.
                • PipeWire connects GStreamer to your speakers or bluetooth headset and provides the controls that allow things like switching from speakers to headphones mid-playback or adjusting the volume on a per-application basis.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jacob View Post
                  Wow, 2023 is the Year of AV1!
                  Or the year of VVC. Most of the new TV sets to be released this year will start to support it, I am curious if the big streaming services are going from HEVC straight to VVC

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by amxfonseca View Post

                    Or the year of VVC. Most of the new TV sets to be released this year will start to support it, I am curious if the big streaming services are going from HEVC straight to VVC
                    The big streaming services seem to be going to AV1 instead.

                    Comment

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