Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Intel Xeon Platinum 8490H "Sapphire Rapids" Performance Benchmarks

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Intel Xeon Platinum 8490H "Sapphire Rapids" Performance Benchmarks

    Phoronix: Intel Xeon Platinum 8490H "Sapphire Rapids" Performance Benchmarks

    Now that the 4th Gen Xeon Scalable "Sapphire Rapids" and Xeon CPU Max Series overview is out of the way, you are probably very eager to see some independent performance benchmarks of the much anticipated Sapphire Rapids CPUs that are going up against AMD 4th Gen EPYC "Genoa" processors for 2023... For kicking off our Sapphire Rapids benchmarking, first up is a look at the Xeon Platinum 8490H performance under Linux as the flagship SKU.

    https://www.phoronix.com/review/inte...platinum-8490h

  • #2
    Michael

    Thanks for the thorough article!

    One area you haven't explored yet is how the EPP (Energy Performance Profile) of the Intel CPUs can affect the power consumption.

    Here's how you can set the desired value:
    Code:
    sudo cpupower set --perf-bias X
    X can be any value between 0-15, where 0 is maximum performance and 15 is maximum energy efficiency.

    With AMD finally adding similar functionality with the upcoming 'amd-pstate-epp' driver, exploring this area of the Linux kernel becomes ever more interesting.

    Couple that with the rising energy costs, and I'm pretty sure quite a few companies would be interested in the results you publish...

    (Personally, I've already switched to running all of my CPUs with the maximum energy efficiency setting applied, and running "sudo cpupower monitor" shows me that my chips are hitting the deepest sleep-states more often & for a longer period of time, even with the performance governor.)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post
      Michael

      Thanks for the thorough article!

      One area you haven't explored yet is how the EPP (Energy Performance Profile) of the Intel CPUs can affect the power consumption.

      Here's how you can set the desired value:
      Code:
      sudo cpupower set --perf-bias X
      X can be any value between 0-15, where 0 is maximum performance and 15 is maximum energy efficiency.

      With AMD finally adding similar functionality with the upcoming 'amd-pstate-epp' driver, exploring this area of the Linux kernel becomes ever more interesting.

      Couple that with the rising energy costs, and I'm pretty sure quite a few companies would be interested in the results you publish...

      (Personally, I've already switched to running all of my CPUs with the maximum energy efficiency setting applied, and running "sudo cpupower monitor" shows me that my chips are hitting the deepest sleep-states more often & for a longer period of time, even with the performance governor.)
      EPP tests have been on my TODO list for a while albeit only so mch time in the day...
      Michael Larabel
      https://www.michaellarabel.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        We run our amd based HPC at 1.5GHz since last October. No change in job throughput as most of them are not compute bound, massive savings on power and cooling. I see Bergamo as our next upgrade and I'll clock it down as low as it will go

        Comment


        • #5
          Not the greatest showing when you consider that most of the time it leaped ahead was with their own tests, and, when you factor in power consumption. AI performance was nice but GPUs are typically better for that these days.
          For the power draw and money, you could just build another single-processor 9554 server, which would most likely make up for any advantages the 8490H has.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by pegasus View Post
            We run our amd based HPC at 1.5GHz since last October. No change in job throughput as most of them are not compute bound, massive savings on power and cooling. I see Bergamo as our next upgrade and I'll clock it down as low as it will go

            You will love Bergamo, 128C/256T per socket, AVX-512 only 360W TDP​

            Genoa vs Bergamo

            GenoavsBergamo2.jpg

            GenoavsBergamo1.jpg
            Last edited by nicalandia; 10 January 2023, 03:49 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              I hope that some Sapphire Rapids-EP SKUs are compatible with the workstation platform. As I use a used Haswell-EP 18C currently and like what it delivers for the price I got it, I became addicted to old server hardware (especially if it can be overclocked).

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ms178 View Post
                (especially if it can be overclocked).
                You don't want to overclock old server hardware as it becomes a fire hazard. What I use is low power 2650L v4 xeons, *downclocked* to 1.2GHz so I get 28 cores running at 70w or so. Very nice desktop for the pandemic times ... but am now looking for an upgrade, maybe a 15w nuc or something like that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Again, I really want a single-die version of this with a single (full) stack of HBM for a desktop CPU.

                  Where I am hurting for performance is in lightly threaded workloads that typically stay under 16GB, and I'm not even talking about AAA games. And AMX would be nice if pytorch can "automatically" make use of it for the cpu-side stuff it does.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's nice to see Intel get some competitiveness back!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X