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Linux 6.3 To Bring Analog TV Support Improvements

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  • Linux 6.3 To Bring Analog TV Support Improvements

    Phoronix: Linux 6.3 To Bring Analog TV Support Improvements

    With the Linux 6.2 merge window behind us, feature work for the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) changes targeting now the Linux 6.3 kernel have begun queuing with DRM-Next...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Linux-6.3-DRM-Analog-TV

  • #2
    That's cool!
    So nice that Linux tries to support every platform and device, floppy disks, analog TVs, etc.

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    • #3
      Time to break out the old Trinitron!

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      • #4
        This is great for retro gaming enthusiasts! They tend to swear by CRTs.

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        • #5
          Had to give my Sony Trinitron and Panasonic flat screen analog TVs to the Salvation Army during digital switch... Not enough room and they were bound to break my back sooner or later.

          Granted, in my spare time now, working with VHS analog to digital conversion... so this is good news with using a laptop s-video out video card for use as a test s-video input on the capture side.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rogerx View Post
            Granted, in my spare time now, working with VHS analog to digital conversion... so this is good news with using a laptop s-video out video card for use as a test s-video input on the capture side.
            Glad to hear you're using S-Video. VHS stores luma and chroma separately. Using a composite video link would mean having the VCR intermodulate them, only for the capture device to have to demodulate them.

            Conversely, Laserdisc natively stores the video signal as composite. If you have a really good TBC/decoder, then it's probably best to use the composite output of a LD player. Laserdisc is a really oddball format, BTW. The deeper you look, the weirder it gets.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by coder View Post
              Glad to hear you're using S-Video. VHS stores luma and chroma separately. Using a composite video link would mean having the VCR intermodulate them, only for the capture device to have to demodulate them.

              Conversely, Laserdisc natively stores the video signal as composite. If you have a really good TBC/decoder, then it's probably best to use the composite output of a LD player. Laserdisc is a really oddball format, BTW. The deeper you look, the weirder it gets.
              You think Laserdisc is oddball? Try the CED

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by QwertyChouskie View Post
                You think Laserdisc is oddball? Try the CED
                Did not watch. Here's the wikipedia page:


                The pickup mechanism is clever, but I think Laserdisc is weirder and was more novel. CED just seems strange to us now, because we're more familiar with cousins of Laserdisc. Even helical-scan video tapes are pretty odd, if you stop and think about it.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by coder View Post
                  Did not watch
                  You're missing out, Technology Connections is an amazing channel.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by QwertyChouskie View Post
                    You're missing out, Technology Connections is an amazing channel.
                    I don't watch YouTube unless I absolutely have to.

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