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  • Solidigm P44 Pro Linux Performance

    Phoronix: Solidigm P44 Pro Linux Performance

    A few months back we looked at the Solidigm P41 Plus NVMe SSD from this company that formed when SK hynix acquired Intel's NAND/SSD business. The P41 Plus was a budget-friendly consumer SSD with QLC memory while recently they launched the P44 Pro as a step-up and based on the SK hynix Platinum P41 design. I've been testing the Solidigm P44 Pro 1TB and 2TB PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSDs under Linux to great performance.

    https://www.phoronix.com/review/solidigm-p44-pro

  • #2
    It's interesting to see the SN850X is leading on average here, considering the Solidigm P44 Pro (and SK Hynix's P41 Platinum which is based on the same hardware) consistently outperform it in benchmarks on other websites. These websites usually don't test database loads though, while this article is mostly testing database loads.

    I'm putting P44 Pros in a new PC build of mine; this will be my first time using a SSD brand other than Samsung.

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    • #3
      Sadly no TCG Opal 2.0 support.

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      • #4
        At this point I'm less concerned about performance and benchmark results than I am about the real world endurance of the cells.

        Clarification: Some SSDs don't refresh the cell charge when they're supposed to be holding data leading to charge loss over longer periods of time (thanks to parasitic drains and the like - no electrical system is 100% efficient or isolated). That and the occasional firmware and controller bugs can lead to data loss. Performance doesn't mean a hell of a lot if you lose data.
        Last edited by stormcrow; 26 December 2022, 02:09 PM. Reason: clarification & grammar's still a ...

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        • #5
          I would never ever get a QLC SSD. When used as a system drive on a rolling Linux distro that gets package updates frequently, aswell as for storing a Steam library, you can already watch a TLC drive degrade rather quickly (approx. 15% every 1,5-2 years on a 1TB drive).

          The more bits per cell are stored, the lower become throughput and IOPS, while drive degradation accelerates. TLC is right at the sweet spot striking a balance between capacity, price and performance. It's not getting any better than this, except for undemanding users who only browse the web and store photos maybe.

          For write-heavy applications (i.e. as a scratch drive for editing highres video footage), MLC (2 bits/cell) is seriously worth considering.
          Last edited by kiffmet; 26 December 2022, 02:57 PM. Reason: grammar

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          • #6
            Agree with the comments on consumer SSD reliability. Backing up your data is as important as ever. Some are under the impression that "solid state" equals no failure modes. This couldn't be further from the truth. Anyone with write intensive workloads should be looking at enterprise SSD's and not consumer products. The consumer products are all so cost-optimized, I wouldn't use them for anything where your livelihood depends on it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by kiffmet View Post

              For write-heavy applications (i.e. as a scratch drive for editing highres video footage), MLC (2 bits/cell) is seriously worth considering.
              For use cases like this you want to be using a RAM drive, not solid state storage whether it's enterprise grade or not if a standard hard drive isn't fast enough.

              I also think this is going to end up being the Mac's new Achilles heel if Apple doesn't address it - non-replaceable storage is going to put video creatives off the platform without an alternative scratch storage mechanism like promoting RAM drives or external fast storage (which is unfortunately expensive if you're using TB3/4). This is one reason many of the creatives I know use Windows desktops for editing and Mac for other things. The storage drives are replaceable (and relatively cheap!).
              Last edited by stormcrow; 26 December 2022, 03:34 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kiffmet View Post
                you can already watch a TLC drive degrade rather quickly (approx. 15% every 1,5-2 years on a 1TB drive).
                Depends on what kind of drive. Intel and Micron have traditionally degraded faster than Samsung, due to an inferior cell design. Micron recently updated their cell design, but I'm not sure about Intel.

                You can make up for some of it by over-provisioning the drive. Also, be sure to use fstrim (many distros run it as a cron job) and generally try not to keep the drive nearly full.

                Originally posted by kiffmet View Post
                For write-heavy applications (i.e. as a scratch drive for editing highres video footage), MLC (2 bits/cell) is seriously worth considering.
                You can't buy true MLC flash, any more. Some write-oriented enterprise models are pseudo-MLC, but most of them are probably migrating towards pseudo-TLC.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                  Anyone with write intensive workloads should be looking at enterprise SSD's and not consumer products. The consumer products are all so cost-optimized, I wouldn't use them for anything where your livelihood depends on it.
                  Not all consumer drives are garbage, nor are all enterprise drives suitable for write-heavy workloads. The high-end consumer drives mostly tend to be TLC, right now, whereas mid-range & lower-end ones are QLC.

                  Enterprise drives are typically segmented into 3 categories: read-oriented (probably QLC), mixed (probably TLC), and write-oriented (probably pseudo-MLC).

                  Be sure to check the endurance stats, as well as the sustained write bandwidth, to know which category a drive falls into.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kiffmet View Post
                    I would never ever get a QLC SSD. When used as a system drive on a rolling Linux distro that gets package updates frequently, aswell as for storing a Steam library, you can already watch a TLC drive degrade rather quickly (approx. 15% every 1,5-2 years on a 1TB drive).

                    The more bits per cell are stored, the lower become throughput and IOPS, while drive degradation accelerates. TLC is right at the sweet spot striking a balance between capacity, price and performance. It's not getting any better than this, except for undemanding users who only browse the web and store photos maybe.

                    For write-heavy applications (i.e. as a scratch drive for editing highres video footage), MLC (2 bits/cell) is seriously worth considering.
                    web browsers are an awful offender. firefox for example will eat up 10gb of writes a day if you use 5 - 7 tabs. especially ones with a lot of media like images. and now with streaming (and porn) being very popular, tons of video. i moved firefox cache to /tmp and even that only marginally reduced writes. i disable browser session restore too. some websites do constant refreshing. one time i ordered chipotle for delivery and forgot to close out of the browser. i left it running for six hours. it wrote 40gb because it kept refreshing gps tracking data. i honestly feel like most people have abused their ssd's to hell and back and don't even realize it simply because of their web browser usage. if you stream twitch all day i wouldn't be surprised if thats 10-30gb a day.

                    oh and in regards to windows, windows does defrag on ssd's when it does trim too. i remember when they had the bug that made defrag run repeatedly: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/new...er-six-months/
                    Last edited by middy; 26 December 2022, 03:49 PM.

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