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Mageia 9 Alpha 1 Released With A Smaller Footprint, Many Updates

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  • Mageia 9 Alpha 1 Released With A Smaller Footprint, Many Updates

    Phoronix: Mageia 9 Alpha 1 Released With A Smaller Footprint, Many Updates

    It's been a year and a half already since the release of Mageia 8 for this Linux distribution whose roots trace back to Mandriva and before that the legendary Mandrake. Mageia 9 will be out as the next iteration of this desktop Linux distro in the months ahead while this weekend there is the release of Mageia 9 Alpha 1...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Mageia-9-Alpha-1

  • #2
    As old Mageia user I changed it for a different distro for several reasons.
    Today after checking out this new mageia 9 alpha1 I have to say that these reasons are still valid.

    What is good:
    - it is stable. Maybe not as Debian Stable but in some way
    - Support old hardware
    - Few desktops available (plasma, gnome etc.)
    - Support for urpmi
    - Keeping Mandriva tools like control-center or all drakX stacks

    What is bad:
    - Outdated core packages even at release day
    - Very outdated packages that are not on the ISO
    - Not enough updates to the stable system release through its life cycle
    - Too long time to create a new release
    - Many packages are compiled with minimal features
    - No performance optimizations
    - No modern packages recently released
    - Slowly fixing reported bugs and often ignoring them
    - Very poor and outdated documentation and wiki.
    - Very few contributors (which mainly causes the problems mentioned above.)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by xpris View Post
      As old Mageia user I changed it for a different distro for several reasons.
      Today after checking out this new mageia 9 alpha1 I have to say that these reasons are still valid.

      What is good:
      - it is stable. Maybe not as Debian Stable but in some way
      - Support old hardware
      - Few desktops available (plasma, gnome etc.)
      - Support for urpmi
      - Keeping Mandriva tools like control-center or all drakX stacks

      What is bad:
      - Outdated core packages even at release day
      - Very outdated packages that are not on the ISO
      - Not enough updates to the stable system release through its life cycle
      - Too long time to create a new release
      - Many packages are compiled with minimal features
      - No performance optimizations
      - No modern packages recently released
      - Slowly fixing reported bugs and often ignoring them
      - Very poor and outdated documentation and wiki.
      - Very few contributors (which mainly causes the problems mentioned above.)
      I'm all for freedom and many distros to choose from, but in this case, it sounds like they could really benefit from merging the project with OpenMandriva.

      Comment


      • #4
        xpris: What do you mean by the following negative points?

        Originally posted by xpris View Post
        - Outdated core packages even at release day
        - Very outdated packages that are not on the ISO
        - Not enough updates to the stable system release through its life cycle
        The kernel and applications are updated regularly, aren't they?​

        What is meant by these points?
        Originally posted by xpris View Post
        - Many packages are compiled with minimal features
        - No performance optimizations
        - No modern packages recently released

        xpris: What kind of distribution did you switch to?

        Thanks in advance for the explanations.​

        Comment

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