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LXQt 1.2 Released With Preliminary Wayland Session Support

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  • #31
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post

    Even adding KWin to that list is a bit generous, considering its current state.

    But the fun begins when you start looking for Wayland native apps. Most of them still run via XWayland
    Any relatively recent application will use native wayland by default, all GTK3 + and Qt5 + applications do, the others will use Xwayland which was in fact built just for legacy applications. I don't see anything odd about this unless you want to break compatibility with older applications.
    For browsers, Firefox works in native mode, while Chromium based still use Xwayland as default, although the wayland support is in good condition, so just change the flag, we hope it will be set by default soon.​

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    • #32
      Originally posted by birdie View Post

      Last time I tried Enlightenment a year ago it didn't have a Wayland session. Maybe it's a Fedora thing.
      It has a Wayland session on pretty much every distro.
      https://www.enlightenment.org/about-wayland

      In fact, it has a Wayland session since at least 2014: https://www.phoronix.com/news/MTYzNDY

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      • #33
        Originally posted by unis_torvalds View Post

        5th if we count Weston!
        Eh? We were talking about DE's, not compositors/window manager. And yes, technically E is a WM as well, but it has a full-blown desktop with its own desktop apps too, so I (and many others with me) am counting it as a DE.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

          Not production ready. They have a long way to go due to the aforementioned scope of a wayland compositor.
          KDE's Wayland session is not production-ready either, but both KDE and E work fine an Wayland for most of the things you want to do.

          Not sure what you mean by "long way to go", btw, 'cause they have been working on it for far longer than KDE. In 2014 they already had the first version with a Wayland session: https://www.phoronix.com/news/MTYzNDY But they had been working on it since the first release of Wayland.

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          • #35
            FVWM 4 ever!

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
              Not sure what you mean by "long way to go", btw,
              Mainly because they have to do a lot of implementation themselves. The boilerplate stuff that is typically provided by the Xserver is unavailable with this ecosystem. With raw Wayland/libdrm, there is much to reinvent.


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              • #37
                Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

                KDE's Wayland session is not production-ready either, but both KDE and E work fine an Wayland for most of the things you want to do.

                Not sure what you mean by "long way to go", btw, 'cause they have been working on it for far longer than KDE. In 2014 they already had the first version with a Wayland session: https://www.phoronix.com/news/MTYzNDY But they had been working on it since the first release of Wayland.

                Originally posted by bug77 View Post

                Even adding KWin to that list is a bit generous, considering its current state.

                But the fun begins when you start looking for Wayland native apps. Most of them still run via XWayland

                ​Can you please clarify what's lacking? I'm using KDE's Wayland Kwin as a daily driver for a few months and so far so good.

                I have the idea of reading that even chrome/firefox hw acceleration works better under wayland

                I'm curious of the things I don't know I'm missing :-)

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by C8292 View Post
                  Can you please clarify what's lacking? I'm using KDE's Wayland Kwin as a daily driver for a few months and so far so good.

                  I have the idea of reading that even chrome/firefox hw acceleration works better under wayland

                  I'm curious of the things I don't know I'm missing :-)
                  https://community.kde.org/Plasma/Wayland_Showstoppers

                  And that's just the official list. I have a few bugs opened that haven't seen any activity in over a year. One of them was actually fixed, but it was left open, because nobody linked it to the actual fix
                  But it's all good, I have exactly zero interest in Wayland right now. X works. When I'll be able to log in a Wayland session that works just as well, I'll switch. Till then, no pressure.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by abu_shawarib View Post

                    No, it wasn't. It is one of the slowest transitions in history.
                    That the transition from X to Wayland would be slow was entirely predictable, most likely the slowest in history, but also the most significant change in GNU / linux history.
                    Everyone knew or predicted that it would take many years before everything was transferred to Wayland, it is GNU / linux where there are hundreds of small projects with few developers, plus Wayland had to enrich themselves with new APIs, to allow all DEs to keep the same features.
                    Personally I believe that at some point they will have to get rid of the Xorg session, because maintaining it still has a cost, but it is still premature.
                    Everyone would like it to be enough to push a button and things magically move to Wayland, but no ... it's much more complicated and complex.
                    Obviously, for the smaller DE it will still take a long time ...​

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post
                      That the transition from X to Wayland would be slow was entirely predictable, most likely the slowest in history, ..​
                      This is the most common misconception. Most fallacists operate under the assumption that there will be a transition because they have been conditioned to lesser systems that provide no alternatives. On linux, there is no scenario where <insert fad du jour> lands across the board on all distributions and eclipses its predecessor. There are users with the freedom to choose whatever is available and create systems and distributions however they see fit; there is no transition no default and nobody can force you to use a particular init, a/v server display system, distro, etc. Many people have been using Wayland for years without issues, same for X.

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