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Open-Source AMD Linux Driver Gets Ready For 50% More VGPRs With RDNA3

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  • Open-Source AMD Linux Driver Gets Ready For 50% More VGPRs With RDNA3

    Phoronix: Open-Source AMD Linux Driver Gets Ready For 50% More VGPRs With RDNA3

    Ahead of AMD's RDNA3 announcement for tomorrow, 3 November, the Mesa 22.3 open-source Radeon graphics driver code continues seeing more RDNA3/GFX11 enablement work landing...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Mesa-RDNA3-50p-More-VGPRs

  • #2
    Hmm will this be the final announcement of the annoument or is there gonna be another announcement and then the release?

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    • #3
      RDNA3 is going to be amazing. 4 RDNA3 CUs are roughly the same size as two RDNA2 CUs and yet pack double the VGPRs.

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      • #4
        Yes but I predict that they'll not present a card that will surpass Nvidia's 4090 in both traditional and raytraced based rendering.

        Their most high-end card will probably be on par in a few games but only when it comes to rasterization based loads, but that's about it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MastaG View Post
          Yes but I predict that they'll not present a card that will surpass Nvidia's 4090 in both traditional and raytraced based rendering.

          Their most high-end card will probably be on par in a few games but only when it comes to rasterization based loads, but that's about it.
          AMD fans deny ray tracing, so rasterization performance is all that matters. They always deny something which AMD hasn't invented.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MastaG View Post
            Yes but I predict that they'll not present a card that will surpass Nvidia's 4090 in both traditional and raytraced based rendering.

            Their most high-end card will probably be on par in a few games but only when it comes to rasterization based loads, but that's about it.
            Honestly there is no reason for it not to... you think AMD would not have prioritized RT being faster on a card that is mainly faster just to be able to do RT... nobody needs a 7900XT for raster only at 4k... at 6900xt or 7800xt is already overkill for that.

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            • #7
              MastaG Everything is possible, especially since a 4090 has more than 3x the shaders compared to a 6900XT and higher clockspeeds, yet it's "only" 63% faster than said AMD card. 4090 gaming IPC per shader core actually got worse compared to Ampere, hinting towards some serious issues regarding scaling.

              In other words, if AMD gets "only" a 63% speed bump out of doubling the CUs, that card would already be on approximately the same level - and so far RDNA2 has looked promising in that regard…

              Historically, Nvidia's chips have been rather small when it comes to ALU count and that has only started changing with Turing.
              On the other hand, AMD spent years of trying to get GCN to scale better outside of compute workloads and IMO this has finally culminated into a research and know-how advantage.

              Besides that, Navi31 will only be slightly above 300mm² (+ 6x ~35mm²) due to disaggregating the caches and IMCs, while Nvidia is approaching the recticle limit… If there has ever been good chance for AMD to take the GPU performance crown, it is now - at least in rasterized workloads. RT will likely remain Nvidia's domain.

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              • #8
                tl;dr: gone are the days of Nvidia Hairworks (tm) on The Witcher

                first of all let me say that generalizing what all AMD GPU users think and do from a few fervorous comment dwellers is moot


                second, if we have to make any sort of generalization (we don't), I'd try to do it from a wider range of comments, and IMHO that would look more like this:

                "most AMD fans would love to have ray-tracing on-par with Nvidia's but are OK with the sacrifice because they have other things they see as more important, like the opensource driver, better OS integration, out-of-the-box experience, performance-per-watt, performance-per-dollar, etc"


                third:
                It's been a while since AMD's last attempt to release a top-top-top-tier card to rival Nvidia's top-top-top-tier cards... but those carda are moot for most users because they are too darn expensive.

                Sure, they bring Nvidia visibility and a select few users get a lot of bragging rights and milk some actual great performance from them.

                But if you're making comparisons, it makes more sense to compare GPUs in the same pricing tier, you need to check the max power rating, noise, heat, etc... they all count too, and are determining factors for real-life GPU choice where AMD has been delivering very competitive product, except in ray-tracing (yet).

                Nvidia has historically managed to gain a lot of extra favour by releasing new exclusive APIs and visual features in the past. Unfortunately for them the gaming and industry scenes have been slowly growing a more serious appetite for opensource drivers and vendor-neutral APIs... and IMHO despite their early success with RTX the new tech has gained less traction among game devs due to wanting to see a vendor-neutral API (mainly Vulkan and DX12) implemented before pouring too much effort in implementing RT everywhere.


                fourth:
                AMD was smart and poached almost all consoles (PS4/5, Xbos Series, Steam Deck, ...), so the gaming industry is strongly invested in making things that work there too, it's not just AMD GPU pc gamers that have reservations towards Nvidia-exclusive stuff anymore.

                Does it look awesome with RT? Sure... but nobody stops buying and playing a game due to missing that unless the game dev is dumb and nerfs their own game from major markets... and a lot of it is still unobtanium, so we have our parties elsewhere and AMD gets richer for all those other reasons

                In the end RT is going a similar path as VR and 3D screens... cool thing, almost everyone that tries it likes it, but it's just an expensive toy, not that broadly available yet and the current tech owner shows no real interest in lowering prices to make it more popular so it's not going anywhere fast (until AMD manages to nail their version of it, then Nvidia will suddenly be in a hurry)
                Last edited by marlock; 02 November 2022, 06:12 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by birdie View Post

                  AMD fans deny ray tracing, so rasterization performance is all that matters. They always deny something which AMD hasn't invented.
                  In this case, Nvidia didn't invent it, either.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LtdJorge View Post

                    In this case, Nvidia didn't invent it, either.
                    Affordable real time ray tracing was invented/implemented by NVIDIA. I know it hurts but it's a fucking fact.

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