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Ubuntu 17.10's Laptop Issue Appears To Be Under Control, Fixable

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  • andre30correia
    replied
    so much talk against canonical but they resolve the problem, Apple and M$ never do that. Some faults we need to wait years before some correction and they are multinationals not like canonical, a small company who don't control the hardware. Another thing Lenovo firmware/bios is a piece of garbage I see problems every day with Lenovo laptops using windows

    Leave a comment:


  • dragon321
    replied
    Originally posted by PackRat View Post

    I just don't know what to think about Linux anymore. Every single disto i have ever tried has had problems or my own stupidity has caused problems, but man oh man "Linux Bricks your computer".

    It's not "Linux" problem but Ubuntu problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • unixfan2001
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    LTS releases are not really LTS. They have years old buggy software. Real long term support is in Debian testing, it has been rolling since mid December 2000. Stable and Debian derivatives distributions are a waste of human resources. You can have a "stable" Debian by installing Debian testing and never update it.

    https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/u.../amd64/iso-cd/
    Literally NOT what testing is about. Sad to see you still don't understand release cycles.

    Leave a comment:


  • raom
    replied
    Why the fuck does an OS kernel driver need to overwrite firmware? How common is this? I haven't kept up much and my machine still uses the old BIOS.

    Leave a comment:


  • torturedutopian
    replied
    Thank you so much. It fixed my friend's laptop :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Anvil
    replied
    Originally posted by PackRat View Post

    If I was a software engineer making cross-platform apps it only makes sense to use a macbook. The real question is: Why Redhat never bought qt for $125 million?
    . why i dunno

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by Spooktra View Post

    Where was I? Using Linux! I stopped using Windows on my personal computer years ago, after the Win 7 system I was running got hit with a cryptovirus. At work I have no choice but none of my home systems run Windows and I wouldn't consider using a Win 10 cd as a coaster let alone install it on a system I own.
    The "Where where you" was in reference to your "if Apple or Microsoft had this happen to them we would be ready to nail them to the nearest wall", i.e both Apple and Microsoft have done this to their users and have done so repeatedly and still neither of them have had to pay for it. Yet you try to pin this as something that only Canonical "gets away with".

    The reality is that this happens with anything software+hardware no matter how much you invest in QA due to the volatile nature of computers and the extreme differences between systems leading to near infinite combinations.

    Leave a comment:


  • aht0
    replied
    [A spokesperson for Intel has been in touch to say the chipmaker is aware of the BIOS cockup triggered by installing Ubuntu Linux 17.10. "We’re actively working with Ubuntu to ensure the issue is corrected," she said. "This is a unique issue based on non-Intel recommended changes made to the BIOS configurations by Ubuntu."
    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/1...u_lenovo_bios/

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  • JeansenVaars
    replied
    Whoever fault this is, Ubuntu and Linux will take all the negative impact there is.
    Summary of the issue is "Ubuntu bricks lenovo laptops", the rest is just outliers and miscellaneous data for people who dig deeper. Most people does not.

    Leave a comment:


  • trek
    replied
    Originally posted by Spooktra View Post
    Why is it this problem only occurs with the latest Ubuntu 17.10 spins? The issue supposedly arises from Intel's SPI (Serial Peripheral Device) driver, code that supplied by Intel themselves and has been thoroughly tested and used by numerous laptops, so why doesn't it happen with that piece of shit offering known as Fedora 27?

    Why doesn't it happen with Arch, Tumbleweed, Leap, Red Hat, Scientific Linux, Cent OS, Manjaro, Mageia, PCLinuxOS, GhostBSD, DragonFlyBSD, OpenIndiana, BSD proper, Debian, Mint, or any of the other Linux variants available?
    probably because the Ubuntu userbase is bigger than the combined userbase of all others distributions you mentioned

    Leave a comment:

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