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Rich Geldreich On The Concerns Of Open-Sourcing In The Game Industry

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  • #21
    Here comes his (strongest) statement:
    Rich Geldreich‏
    @richgel999
    19 Std.vor 19 Stunden
    Mehr
    GPL (and LGPL) are the kiss of death.
    https://twitter.com/richgel999/statu...80487390068736

    Is he still working for M§...

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    • #22
      Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
      Certainly no offense to yourself but this is actually a good example of why the games industry is so against open-source. It really is due to a lack of knowledge and experience in their trade. Also, peer review of code helps fix bugs so open-source software is often so much more secure.
      None taken. I fully admit I don't know anything about the subject.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by FLHerne View Post
        Anyway...clients aren't trusted. They can't be trusted, ever, so opening the source doesn't make a difference.
        they can't be trusted to not point cursor at target automatically
        this means you can really only play in controlled environment in same room

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        • #24
          Originally posted by andrebrait View Post
          None taken. I fully admit I don't know anything about the subject.
          And in all honesty, the fact you are on a Linux related technology forum actually suggests it is highly likely that you still know much more about technology than a lot of game developers that I have had the misfortune of working with. Many of them don't know what a forum is let alone a Linux haha.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
            He just should have used GNU GPL and all would be good. His problem is not with sharing the code, but with permissive licensing.
            Exactly, and if he wanted to sell licenses for others to use it in proprietary software he could dual license it as long as he owns all the copyright.

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            • #26
              On the subject of cheating on games, I remember Asus advertise some of their monitors provide crosshair on games that don't have them (Counter Strike). Other example are mouse and keyboards, that can execute macros that will punch a number of keys in a way that is impossible for humans for reproduce.

              If you can't cheat on the game or OS level, there is the hardware level to take advantage off.
              Last edited by [email protected]; 30 November 2017, 01:45 PM.

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              • #27
                He's welcome to regret it all he wants, that doesn't mean that other people shouldn't consider it, I think that's really the silly part of this.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by baka0815 View Post
                  How should the server validate the client certificate? If you have control over the client you can send arbitrary data.
                  You could make a protocol which relies on some asymmetric keys or stuff, but you would have to keep the public key a secret as well, so this wouldn't work either.
                  And this is why the Good Guys (tm) at Intel invented ME (and AMD has PSP), to allow third parties ensure that the client isn't trying to send bullshit.

                  The only reason most games don't use Intel ME is that the publishers aren't pushing anti-cheat as hard.

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                  • #29
                    This guy likes to complain a lot, though. A lot is about his work (and probably himself) not being praised enough ( I read that as he's dissatisfied with the current job(s)/tangible compensation it has resulted for him).

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by andrebrait View Post
                      To be honest, I never know what to think when it comes to open sourcing games and whatnot, specially if they're competitive in some way.

                      I mean, let's assume one open-sources Counter-Strike. I take the source code, modify it so it renders stuff transparent and compile it, and then I go to an online game. How would the server know in any way that I'm cheating? I can very well report that everything is fine if I change the source code of the anti-cheat system as well...

                      (I know there are ways of bypassing these things even though the software is closed-source, but I always wondered how it would be done if it was open-sourced).

                      Wouldn't I be able to report to the server whatever is that the server uses to know I'm not cheating? For example, let's suppose it's a hashing of sorts. I can just report the hash of the executable and whatnot from the normal file (open the normal file, replace it for the current one during calculation, send the hash, close it) and keep cheating.

                      I really have zero knowledge on how anti-cheat systems work, btw. I'm a competent developer, but I know nothing about this specially.

                      Here's an idea: the server also renders/calculates the game and only sends you, the information you're supposed to 'watch'...

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