Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

KDE Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • KDE Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

    Phoronix: KDE Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

    Today marks twenty-one years since the KDE project was founded...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...E-21-Years-Old

  • #2
    I would really like if KDE and Gnome could sort out the theme support.
    It might be a GTK and QT issue, but that would be nice.

    Comment


    • #3
      Congratulation KDE! Since my early Linux days I have used KDE. It is still my favorite and I personally think it has a bright future. So many good things originated from KDE! The next big step will be stable Wayland support with Plasma 5.12. And afterwards we might get a Vulkan back-end, who knows 😉 One thing I would like to see improved is stability, Kwin does it right with all the automatic test cases, so there is hope that toolkit changes like Qt 6 might be less visible to users 🙂 Anyway KDE it is a community project and hence it has my respect for all it's flexibility and functionalities 🙂

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah congrats. I didn't care at all for KDE4, but Plasma is awesome. It is a fantastic interface for windows users coming to linux. I've showed linux to a bunch of people, but the best luck I've had has been with Plasma. Great work guys. Honestly.

        Comment


        • #5
          I remember eagerly compiling KDE 1.1 on my DEC Alpha in 1999. I think it took a week to finish. Good times.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
            I remember eagerly compiling KDE 1.1 on my DEC Alpha in 1999. I think it took a week to finish. Good times.
            You had a DEC Alpha? Neat!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bug77 View Post
              You had a DEC Alpha? Neat!
              My day job back then was building supercomputers for DEC (later Compaq) customers. Specifically the two I was involved with were the supercomputers at Pittsburgh and at Los Alamos. They were Tru64 UNIX on ES and GS series Alphaservers. We were playing with Linux on Alpha internally in our test lab, but at the time, it wasn't yet available to customers as a supported platform. The first Linux/Alpha supercomputer was sold just as I left the company around the time of the HP merger. They did let me take an XP1000 home when I left the company, top end spec with 667 Mhz EV67 and 2 GB of RAM. Still have it on a shelf in my basement, haven't powered it on in years. I loaded Gentoo on it at one point. It's funny to think that a new iPad is now more powerful than this XP1000.
              Last edited by torsionbar28; 14 October 2017, 11:25 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Happy birthday

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                  My day job back then was building supercomputers for DEC (later Compaq) customers. Specifically the two I was involved with were the supercomputers at Pittsburgh and at Los Alamos. They were Tru64 UNIX on ES and GS series Alphaservers. We were playing with Linux on Alpha internally in our test lab, but at the time, it wasn't yet available to customers as a supported platform. The first Linux/Alpha supercomputer was sold just as I left the company around the time of the HP merger. They did let me take an XP1000 home when I left the company, top end spec with 667 Mhz EV67 and 2 GB of RAM. Still have it on a shelf in my basement, haven't powered it on in years. I loaded Gentoo on it at one point. It's funny to think that a new iPad is now more powerful than this XP1000.
                  Hehe, back then I only read about these in magazines, drooled all over it and thought this is (almost) stuff of legends. Those were my senior high-school and junior college years.
                  (For those that don't know, those were the years we switched from 16 to 32bit, while these Alphas were 64bit capable.)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Happy birthday!

                    I've been testing KDE from time to time over the years and always felt pretty slow on my laptop.
                    MATE seemed the fastest.
                    These days, MATE seems slower, maybe because of GTK3 switch...
                    And KDE seems faster and snapier while consuming the smallest amount of memory of all the DEs I have tested.
                    I'm truly impressed!
                    I hope they will continue improving its customization possibilities and "borrowing" of good features from Windows.
                    I hope to see them implement a "task manager" (resource monitor) like in Windows 8 / 10.
                    That would be really amazing.
                    Its boot performance tab could be easily taken from systemd's analyze tool, I think.
                    Also I would like to see processes and their children groupped together, for example Firefox and Chromium which nowadays spread their work into multiple processes and it's hard to see a combined value of their CPU and memory usage.
                    Anyway, great work and big thank you for the developers!

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X