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Clear Linux Switches From Xfce To GNOME, Benchmarks

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  • Originally posted by danielnez1 View Post

    In the old days of GNOME 3, people could still use the Fallback session, however once that was removed and before GNOME classic came on the scene, if a system was upgraded, without removing their old profile, GNOME would simply crash with the infamous and useless "Oh no something has went wrong".
    I mean install GNOME 2 packages or some fork of it and not use some fallback mode of GNOME 3 that uses extension to simulate a GNOME 2 experience.
    I believe the current version of what you are talking about this is the GNOME Flashback session.
    https://wiki.gnome.org/Projects/GnomeFlashback

    But it is true that GNOME did a hard break and not offer an easy way to transition to the new way of things e.g. by no allowing to easily switching fort and back single features from old to new. That may have not been their best move but one probably inspired by the likes of Steve Jobs when he removed the arrow keys from the keyboards so people had to start using the mouse instead.

    They may have wanted people to try out their new concepts without everyone just switching to GNOME 2 mode by default and no one ever trying out the new stuff. Again this may have been a bad move but I understand why they would have done it.

    At the end GNOME Flashback will stay a mixup experience of GNOME 2 Desktop concepts with applications clearly designed for GNOME 3.
    It may ease the transition for some people.

    Originally posted by danielnez1 View Post
    Comparing tools to medicine is an analogy, just like what the Desktop metaphor is supposed to be...
    I just think it is a rather bad analogy as we start to use it further for more examples and build a debate on it. Staying with a tools analogy is much more in line with what DEs actually are and tools is the place where many metaphors we find in current DEs come from. Basic lectures about HCI and Interface Design and use analogies to tools for a reason (Not going into the detail here as it is getting a little bit to much Off-Topic).

    ( Maybe rather use the drug analogy for describing FLOSS as an option to heal people from proprietary software )

    So would you not use a more modern tool that if you learned to work with it may be more efficient for you? Would you keep using a scythe because it was proven to be a reliable tool for farming although new tools are available? You know that people believed they would die from the speed the first trains where going? People adapted and by today we have all means of transportation and that is not because of the people who kept screaming we want to keep doing it the old way.
    You will find many of the old things trough your life some kept for nostalgic reasons, some by people who wanted or could not change their ways and sometimes because it still is the best way to do things.

    It still may be good to accept that both those things can happily coexist and sometimes even learn from each other.
    No one is saying the old way is essentially the worse way to do things but it needs people and projects that try out new stuff.

    But if people only can hate on DEs that do not fir their use that is sad. Like I said that energy could all be used to either express constructive critic or by contributing to projects that are more in line of what they expect their tools to behave.

    Believe it or not there are people out there that enjoy GNOME 3 as a DE and user experience.

    Originally posted by danielnez1 View Post
    As to Horton/Griffin's latest rabble about the GTK inspector, to they seriously think end users should use such a tool to make basic changes to the UI? That's not very "user friendly" or something you'd expect to use in a "professionally developed" desktop now is it?
    I still don't believe it works that way as it did not save my changes to use the dark adwaita theme on restart. GtkInspector is a tool to inspect your running Gtk application that also allows to do some element attribute changes in real time and visualization off different stuff very similar to how developer tools in a browsers work.

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    • Originally posted by Griffin View Post
      Leipero. Extensions don't need to go to tweak tool. Installation is done from gnome-software, and that comes with appstream data and reviews. Fully searchable!
      That's neat, I didn't know that, still argument stands for Font scaling at least on gnome control center.

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      • Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        Decent GUI programs ... allow you to save presets, so the same job can be launched in a couple clicks.
        By your estimation, are there many “decent” GUI programs?

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        • Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          Please find a source that isn't obviously contradicting your statements as this way you only make a fool out of yourself. That blog writer said in the first paragraph:

          Seems like the CLI has become unfashionable to many, while the GUI is the preferred way of doing things.
          Really, the optimum way to use a computer nowadays is with a combination of both (CLI and GUI).
          You forgot this bit:

          GUIs may come and GUIs may go, but the CLI is the one true timeless computer interface.

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          • Originally posted by Griffin View Post
            Grege. Extensions are also supported by gnome-software.
            Thank you. As a long time Synaptic user I had not noticed that they had added this functionality.

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            • Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              not all people bashing Griffin are KDE fans. dungeon uses xfce and I'm more a GNOME hater than a KDE fan.
              He, he, i missed this. First, I use whatever no problem if it is in short time , but usually i am minimal custom plain openbox user

              Second, not sure i ever said that i use XFCE, to me even that is bloat. While KDE and Gnome are crazy bloats, on these two i can't decide just who is crazier
              Last edited by dungeon; 05-28-2017, 07:44 AM.

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              • There even exist people who think syntax highlighting is bloat.

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                • Originally posted by grege View Post

                  Thank you. As a long time Synaptic user I had not noticed that they had added this functionality.
                  I also had no clue about it. But, since extensions are searchable in software now, and since they are different from from other software, maybe adding category for browsing them would be good idea (if not added yet), software application does not come with Arch gnome and gnome-extra groups, and since i do most of the things from terminal and prefer pamac for updates (mainly because of AUR updates auto-checks) I didn't know about it. But adding category for extensions (if it didn't implemented) would be great thing for user-friendliness, since people can search extension only if they know the name for it and/or funcionality that might be named differently to what user might think.

                  Also, in tweak-tool it should be added "explore in software" link that would lead to software application, ar adding to existing "add more extensions".
                  Last edited by leipero; 05-28-2017, 08:25 AM.

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                  • Originally posted by ldo17 View Post
                    You forgot this bit:

                    GUIs may come and GUIs may go, but the CLI is the one true timeless computer interface.
                    That's just saying that CLI will never change (and I hope so as I don't like script breakage), does not contradict his first statements that you still need both GUI and CLI.

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                    • Originally posted by Griffin View Post
                      How disappointing! KDE can't be customized like Gnome with GTK inspector!
                      Sounds like a development tool.

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