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Mark Shuttleworth Reportedly Returning To Role As Canonical CEO

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  • #21
    Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
    When it turned purple, it was all downhill from then on. That was 10.04, a horrible release.
    Same feeling, when it changed to purple, blergh...



    Originally posted by AndyChow View Post
    As far as female CEOs in tech, Lisa Su is the best thing to happen to AMD in years.
    Lisa Su rocks, she is nerdy and very skilled, it's a shame people judge her because she "looks like a lesbian"


    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by artyom.h31 View Post

      I don't care which OS runs my router. It may be FreeBSD, QNX, WinNT or anything else. I won't even notice if it will change.
      Even if somebody has taken advantage of its security holes and made it part of a botnet being used to attack somebody else?

      Somebody needs to be legally liable for that...

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      • #23
        Originally posted by lucrus View Post

        You can always go back to Windows now, I think no one in the OSS community is going to miss you anyway.
        When Unity is gone so I might as well. But this would result in a Linux marketshare drop from 1.0203 to 1.0202.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by DrYak View Post

          Except maybe on computing cluster, where nearly all of the TOP500 are running some Linux variant.
          And except on cloud servers.
          And except on modem, nearly every last modem and router runs some Linux + Busybox. Including the modem through which you're publicizing your critique.
          And except on smartphones, where android is the dominant platform with Linux kernel (+ google's weird user space).
          And except on countless smart devices around you (ex.: some smart TV's like Samsung's. E-books like Kobo's. GPS SatNav's like Tomtom's. In car infotainment. etc.)

          Well basically Linux never had any markshare, except on everything beside the desktop.
          Outside of desktop, the Linux kernel (usually paired with GNU, Busybox or Google's user space) is nearly universally the dominant platform.

          And when I say "desktop", I literally mean the OS on which you work on a daily basis on your workstation.
          Linux is in fact *ALSO* running somewhere inside your workstation : the small low-power SoC embed in the northbridge that helps remote managemend (Called "Intel ME (Management Engine)" by Intel, and called "IPMI" by anybody else. Basically a minimalistic webserver/VNC allowing administrator to remotely mange your workstation even if it is powered down).
          You're totally right! Except thet Linux isn't really big in car infotainment yet and it will get tough for Linux to become big there now that QNX has struck some big deals with some well-known, big car manufacturers and also develops together with big names like Panasonic.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by artyom.h31 View Post

            I don't care which OS runs my router. It may be FreeBSD, QNX, WinNT or anything else. I won't even notice if it will change.
            I don't care which OS runs cloud servers. I receive some kind of service and don't know how it is implemented.
            I don't care which OS runs my smartphones and smart devices. Most of them are powered by some ancient crippled Linux version and most of them don't even allow me to enter console.
            But I _do care_ which OS run my desktops and laptops. Because I interact with it every day and feel it's strengths and weaknesses.
            So what if you don't care? The whole point was that Linux *does* have a lot of marketshare, contrary to what mike44 posted.

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            • #26
              I hope it will continue.
              Not by Canonical, but by some other guys.
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVEm4X2ptEk
              Unity is just a great desktop. I love it and use it for my daily work since it was released.
              It's just the same interface on my desktop PC, my smartphone and tablet.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by andrei_me View Post
                Lisa Su rocks, she is nerdy and very skilled, it's a shame people judge her because she "looks like a lesbian"
                This is what's wrong with humanity. People judging by looks alone.

                I don't want to live on this planet anymore... Elon? Can you hear me?

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
                  Except thet Linux isn't really big in car infotainment yet and it will get tough for Linux to become big there now that QNX has struck some big deals with some well-known, big car manufacturers and also develops together with big names like Panasonic.
                  Actually, cars don't have a single computer anymore. As Tesla puts it, modern cars are more data-centers on wheels (Model S/X cars at least have 3 different ubuntu-running significantly-sized computers in their cars - one driving each colour-screen/touch-tablet, and a 3rd functioning as a central server/router relaying to the various real-time hardware component)

                  QNX, due to being a RT-OS, is popular on the computers conversing with actual car hardware (e.g.: it's probably running on the computer connected to the radar and the forward facing camera / LIDARs used by the Adaptive Cruise-control/Forward-collision-avoidance-system. I'll have to check on the parents' Volvo). That isn't going to change, RT-OS are a necessity for this class of industrial work, and that's why QNX has such successful licensing deals.
                  (or else all the "Are you sure ? ( Y / N ) _ " jokes about car's brakes or air-bags will end up happening for real).

                  On the other hand, the thing driving the big colour screen(s) is quite often either a GNU/Linux stack (or BusyBox/Linux) with some Qt interface (based on some core of the Maemo / Meego / Mobilin family), or even Android/Linux (latest Renault R-Link), because of familiarity with the people writing the user interface (e.g.: you can re-use mapping software from Tom-tom as-is, provide Spotify as infortainment app, etc.)
                  All this keeps the development costs down (and to be frank, you don't need the satnav instruction "Turn Ride", the automatic FM-RDS/DAB-DLS kick in with Traffic Announcement, and the air-conditionning to be timed with perfect predictability down to the micro-second).
                  (And sometime you can even check the GPL on the interface - I think you can ask the Renault Zoé on my local car-sharing network to display it).

                  All these talk over a CAN-bus network. Often several network to provide proper isolation (E.g.: that's the case in Tesla - thus isolating the critical systems from a hack/crash. That's NOT the case in Hondas enabling comma.ai to build things like their openpilot which can access to the forward radar and rear camera and control the cruise control and stearing wheel, all by simply tapping into the normal CAN-bus).

                  So yeah.... TL;DR: Linux *is* popular inside cars, just not in the parts you think about when your read about QNX.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    Now it's also inside 3G/4G modem cards/dongles.
                    Qualcomm ones here https://osmocom.org/news/63
                    And also most modern Huawei LTE dongles have some kind of crappy Android system inside
                    Thank for the info.

                    Speaking of "weird places to find a Linux Kernel running" :
                    Digital Cameras.
                    Not the main OS driving the objective and taking pictures (that tends to run on some other proprietary OS).
                    But the Wifi server.

                    Lots of older non-SDIO "combined Flash + Wifi" cards (like Trascend Wifi, PQI Air, etc.) run an embed Linux fileserver that is hackable (well except for Toshiba FlashAir)

                    Lots of more modern cameras has the moved the embed Linux-server chip inside the camera body instead of the SD card.

                    And then there Samsumg Galaxy Cameras which actually DO run Android on the main CPU.
                    (so you don't even need to download the files over wifi, you can directly put the filters and upload them to instagram from within the camera interface).


                    The SD flash+wifi are hackable. You can put your own scripts on the card (e.g.: automatic rsync backups)
                    or even hack them further and incorporate them into Arduino projects.
                    (Due to bigger market and higher production runs, second hand SD flash+wifi cards and adapters are cheaper on e-bay, than what you would pay for a dedicated Wifi shield and SD-Card reading shield, and you get an extra Linux-running CPU out of the bargain)




                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by DrYak View Post

                      Actually, cars don't have a single computer anymore. As Tesla puts it, modern cars are more data-centers on wheels (Model S/X cars at least have 3 different ubuntu-running significantly-sized computers in their cars - one driving each colour-screen/touch-tablet, and a 3rd functioning as a central server/router relaying to the various real-time hardware component)

                      QNX, due to being a RT-OS, is popular on the computers conversing with actual car hardware (e.g.: it's probably running on the computer connected to the radar and the forward facing camera / LIDARs used by the Adaptive Cruise-control/Forward-collision-avoidance-system. I'll have to check on the parents' Volvo). That isn't going to change, RT-OS are a necessity for this class of industrial work, and that's why QNX has such successful licensing deals.
                      (or else all the "Are you sure ? ( Y / N ) _ " jokes about car's brakes or air-bags will end up happening for real).

                      On the other hand, the thing driving the big colour screen(s) is quite often either a GNU/Linux stack (or BusyBox/Linux) with some Qt interface (based on some core of the Maemo / Meego / Mobilin family), or even Android/Linux (latest Renault R-Link), because of familiarity with the people writing the user interface (e.g.: you can re-use mapping software from Tom-tom as-is, provide Spotify as infortainment app, etc.)
                      All this keeps the development costs down (and to be frank, you don't need the satnav instruction "Turn Ride", the automatic FM-RDS/DAB-DLS kick in with Traffic Announcement, and the air-conditionning to be timed with perfect predictability down to the micro-second).
                      (And sometime you can even check the GPL on the interface - I think you can ask the Renault Zoé on my local car-sharing network to display it).

                      All these talk over a CAN-bus network. Often several network to provide proper isolation (E.g.: that's the case in Tesla - thus isolating the critical systems from a hack/crash. That's NOT the case in Hondas enabling comma.ai to build things like their openpilot which can access to the forward radar and rear camera and control the cruise control and stearing wheel, all by simply tapping into the normal CAN-bus).

                      So yeah.... TL;DR: Linux *is* popular inside cars, just not in the parts you think about when your read about QNX.
                      Wrong. QNX has struck deals for their car infotainment platform IN cars as well. They have that, you know: http://www.qnx.com/solutions/industr...otainment.html

                      Also have a look at https://www.forbes.com/sites/lianeyv.../#2a70ff8743cf where it's explained that QNX does power a lot of those car infotainment computers.
                      Even big names like Mercedes are using it on their on-board computers: https://www.engadget.com/2014/01/08/...a45-qnx-car-2/
                      Their marketshare is more than 50%: http://www.gpsbusinessnews.com/QNX-L...are_a5276.html

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