Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by Pawlerson View Post

    The same can be said about gnome: Qt - > gtk and KDE -> gnome.
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post

    Minix -> Linux
    Oh, wait...
    Minix an QT both had non-free licenses when Linux and Gnome were started.

    Comment


    • #22
      I prefer the decentralized nature of AppImages better, but KDE would certainly have a hard time packaging that way because of the large shared dependencies many of their applications have. That's why a KDE flatpak runtime is important. That said, some KDE applications are already packaged as AppImages.

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by FishPls View Post
        Do you still need to run the Flatpak packages with flatpak run though?
        I think that is true for the command line but I have some flatpaks installed and I can just start them via gnome shell like any other application I installed from distro repositories.

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by Inopia View Post


          Minix an QT both had non-free licenses when Linux and Gnome were started.
          Depends on your definition of free. Is the code truly free if it comes with limitations about what can you do with it? (And no, I don't know the answer to that one myself.)

          Comment


          • #25
            It's pretty easy to host your own snaps and point snappy to your own repo.

            https://github.com/noise/snapstore/

            The best thing would be to have repo snaps that basically only add a new external snaps repo and have them in a centralized place. This way you won't really have to browse the web and download snaps from websites or copy paste a bunch of bullshit to add repos and everyone still has their own store.

            Comment


            • #26
              Snap is a single-distribution solution: https://www.reddit.com/r/linux/comme...ter_canonical/

              Comment


              • #27
                canonical relies on proprietary components? what a surprise!

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by Up123 View Post
                  In what ways is Flatpak more advance?
                  in technical ones

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by FishPls View Post
                    Seriously, just compare how you install the same package on Flatpak and Snap. Flatpak first:


                    flatpak --user remote-add --no-gpg-verify tutorial-repo repo

                    flatpak --user install tutorial-repo org.test.Hello


                    Snap:


                    snap install hello


                    How on earth is flatpak better?
                    it allows several sources.
                    snap has same thing as remote-add hardcoded.
                    how on earth people can be so stupid?

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      Originally posted by FishPls View Post
                      Do you still need to run the Flatpak packages with flatpak run though?
                      no, you are free to hide it in script/shortcut

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X