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Valve Reports Steam Linux Usage Fell Further In March

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  • eydee
    replied
    The main problem is still the lack of well-known games. People may put up with the lack of user friendliness, if their favorites ran and ran well. But no. What was the last time your library got a new steamplay title? Or did any of the recent popular games got a linux port? Neither I guess.

    Also the steam machines and steam controller getting bad reviews doesn't help either. People wanting a console experience would still buy regular consoles.

    Leave a comment:


  • eddielinux
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    Why I don't game in Linux:
    • Input lag.
      Moving my cursor on the screen or looking around in an FPS game feels like I'm on a boat.
    • It messes up my desktop.
      Alt+tabbing from/to the game/desktop with the game running in a different resolution fucks up my desktop icons.
    • No tweaking available.
      I cannot configure stuff like DSR, prerendered frames, triple buffering, etc, in the Linux nvidia panel.
    • There's no nvidia inspector equivalent.
    • No shader injection tools (SweetFX, etc.)
    • Missing graphics features in the Linux versions of many games.
    If these things would be fixed, Linux would be a good gaming platform for me. Right now, it's total ass.

    In my machine (amd fx8350, 16gb ram, nvidia gtx760 2gb) runs good without recording gameplays.
    Alt+tabbing, I mostly don't do, but I'm curious about how many games in my library tend to mess or crash, I'll try later
    IMHO because gsync and freesync, triple buffer will be obsolete in the next years. DSR/VSR give us more crispy graphics but need some market stabilization, if(probably will) 4k monitors become mainstream, more robust gpus will be needed and this function will be obsolete too (pixel density and human eye perception correlation).
    Well, SweetFX turns graphics very nice looking, but in my mind came a question, with some adjustments on directly monitor can we achieve the same effects?

    Leave a comment:


  • sterky
    replied
    Originally posted by theriddick View Post
    Yeah one of the big issues with OGL and Linux is Vsync behavior and also the lack of freesync/gsync(or did nvidia add that?). With my testing I found VSYNC had a catastrophic effect on game FPS and smoothness.

    Been using gsync for 4-5 months under Arch Linux with nvidia gtx 970, it's working real nice, the few issues there have been, have mostly been fixed with driver updates.

    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    Why I don't game in Linux:
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    • Input lag.
      Moving my cursor on the screen or looking around in an FPS game feels like I'm on a boat.
    • It messes up my desktop.
      Alt+tabbing from/to the game/desktop with the game running in a different resolution fucks up my desktop icons.
    • No tweaking available.
      I cannot configure stuff like DSR, prerendered frames, triple buffering, etc, in the Linux nvidia panel.
    • There's no nvidia inspector equivalent.
    • No shader injection tools (SweetFX, etc.)
    • Missing graphics features in the Linux versions of many games.
    If these things would be fixed, Linux would be a good gaming platform for me. Right now, it's total ass.



    For the mouse lag, you could try this, if you happen to have a good gaming mouse, which has enough dpi to drive without acceleration.
    Create a file /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/90-mouse.conf with contents:
    Section "InputClass"
    Identifier "mouse"
    MatchIsPointer "on"
    Option "AccelerationProfile" "-1"
    Option "AccelerationScheme" "none"
    EndSection

    Works wonders for my Roccat Savu, driving 1440p screen @ 4k dpi

    Leave a comment:


  • kaszak
    replied
    I gave up on Steam on Linux, since Valve is very clear thet they don't care if it works on GNU/Linux, they only care about SteamOS. Instead of using your system's installed libraries, it downloads the "Steam Runtime", hundreds of megabytes of outdated libraries based on Ubuntu 12.04. That's just bizarre, and causes multitude of issues on up-to-date systems.

    Leave a comment:


  • theriddick
    replied
    Yeah one of the big issues with OGL and Linux is Vsync behavior and also the lack of freesync/gsync(or did nvidia add that?). With my testing I found VSYNC had a catastrophic effect on game FPS and smoothness.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kano
    replied
    I only noticed extreme input lag with fglrx and my HD 5670 and L4D2, some say it was fixed later but they used newer/faster cards. In general you should disable vsync if that happens, if the refresh rate is still above 60 then possible tearing is more or less invisible. DiRT Showdown with vsync and a slow card/too high settings feels laggy as soon as the fps changes from one step to the next like 20/30/40/45/60. But in general you can often find a working setting, most likely lower than your Windows setting however. There are only very few games that run at max speed with OpenGL.

    Leave a comment:


  • theriddick
    replied
    In general this command works, however Steam can sometimes update and redownload the deleted files meaning you need to run this again.

    find ~/.steam/root/ \( -name "libgcc_s.so*" -o -name "libstdc++.so*" -o -name "libxcb.so*" \) -print -delete

    Leave a comment:


  • Adarion
    replied
    I personally am upset with Steam. It refused to even run on my system for the past months. I still relies on 32bit libs, and even brings some bundled. Apparently it helps if you start deleting some of the bundled libs and force Steam to use the system's libs (e.g. Gentoo x86 multiABI), but that might fail, too. I mean, they really should get their stuff working as independently as possible.
    Besides, some games need to get their Linux specific bugs fixed. And some of those bugs are not really the fault of Linux. Or does anybody think it is sane that a small indie game keeps 100'000 files open at the same time? (though that game also crashes on Windows...)

    Leave a comment:


  • theriddick
    replied
    Originally posted by RealNC View Post
    Why I don't game in Linux:
    • Input lag.
      Moving my cursor on the screen or looking around in an FPS game feels like I'm on a boat.

    If these things would be fixed, Linux would be a good gaming platform for me. Right now, it's total ass.
    I get this sometimes in certain games also, I found out recently under Ubuntu at least that there is a keyboard setting that screws up controls, keystroke or key repeat. There is likely similar for mouse, these issues actually exist for Windows users also but are easier to find and disable, whereas in Linux many settings are just hidden from the user in the GUI (there accessible via terminal).

    Leave a comment:


  • eddielinux
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    Not gonna do that, crap is crap, why bother.
    Oh! nice answer, you don't realize how much this tells me about you:
    1 - You were/are a windows user (this is not bad, but ex-windows users are more critcs; familiarity bias);
    2 - You never coded anything;
    3 - Probably you like linux because is free of charge;
    4 - You have problem to understand freedom;
    5 - You have less respect the people on the backstage(devs) and their opinion;
    6 - You don't know how to act as part of freedom in community (I had some trouble to teach myself too);

    I have no problem in dealing with it, but I must to tell you something, if you don't fill a bug form they will never know what happened (I know, a lots of newcomers don't know how to do and as veteran users we need to teach them before is too late), to our community survive, information is crucial.

    Why destruct when we can construct?
    Why demolish when we can fix?
    You will possibly disagree with me, but attacking each other will make us colapse, we are community driven and as we see in any world history book, too much disagreement makes everything fall apart.
    As part of this incredible community we need to never forget that our freedom is at stake and teamwork is needed to reach the victory, even if you don't like one teammate pulseaudio, which for me is a good player.
    Last edited by eddielinux; 02 April 2016, 04:16 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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