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Tjernlund M-6: Finding A Better Way To Cool The Benchmarking Server Room

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  • Tjernlund M-6: Finding A Better Way To Cool The Benchmarking Server Room

    Phoronix: Tjernlund M-6: Finding A Better Way To Cool The Benchmarking Server Room

    After months of experimenting with different methods for better cooling the basement server room where 60+ systems are running Linux benchmarks on a daily basis, for less than $100 USD I've found a fan that does an amazing job keeping the temperature suitable for all of the running systems.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=22369

  • #2
    Water cool them and use it to make hot water for your house!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jonsmirl View Post
      Water cool them and use it to make hot water for your house!
      Unfortunately that's no where close to being economical...
      Michael Larabel
      http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        Cooling in a datacenter can be underrated. In fact the design of your airflow is probably the most important thing in a datacenter.
        Do not ever have some cases in a room. Have a cold side, and a warm side. The best is to either isolate the cold side or the warm side.
        In your case I would probably isolate the warm side, using a plastic "tent" or something like that, and suck the air from the isolated part to your livingroom, or to the outside. You will need blinders in your closet to prevent loss of pressure and getting unheated air.
        Long ago there were mainframe rooms, and they were designed that the whole room has a constant temperature. But mainframes were nothing more than big closets of air with tiny computers in them.
        Then the internet came, and in a mainframe room for a single mainframe, you can house > 10kA worth of pc-servers. That's when you start to cry when you just build another dataroom intended for a mainframe instead of pc-servers... And it takes another 10 years before hot and cold corridors became a thing ;-).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Michael View Post

          Unfortunately that's no where close to being economical...
          Unless you shop on Ebay.

          Linus had no problem doing it.

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          • #6
            That's five systems in the video, not around 60.... Doing so would easily be several thousand dollars.
            Michael Larabel
            http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Michael View Post

              That's five systems in the video, not around 60.... Doing so would easily be several thousand dollars.
              Not counting several hundreds of work hours...
              ## VGA ##
              AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
              Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
                Not counting several hundreds of work hours...
                And figuring out how to easily route tubes into the 2U cases, etc.
                Michael Larabel
                http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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                • #9
                  Interesting videos, but the guy clearly says that they won't do it again, that it was a fun experiment, but not as good as AC would be.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michael View Post

                    That's five systems in the video, not around 60.... Doing so would easily be several thousand dollars.
                    And doing it at 60+ machine scale would probably warrant a more industrial solution including a water chiller, a gravity tank (up high so that the water flows down hill), a fairly serious water pump and a lot of water blocks... all to remove the same amount of heat that the current air solution does!


                    Originally posted by Ardje View Post
                    ...Have a cold side, and a warm side. The best is to either isolate the cold side or the warm side.
                    In your case I would probably isolate the warm side, using a plastic "tent" or something like that, and suck the air from the isolated part to your livingroom, or to the outside. You will need blinders in your closet to prevent loss of pressure and getting unheated air...
                    This could be a cheap experiment to run michael... and might make things cheaper next summer... and you can try it out on 1 rack first with a few well placed temp sensors to get the data you need.

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