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The Daala Video Codec Still Needs At Least Another Year Of Development

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  • The Daala Video Codec Still Needs At Least Another Year Of Development

    Phoronix: The Daala Video Codec Still Needs At Least Another Year Of Development

    The Daala open-source, royalty-free video codec being developed by Xiph.Org and other organizations continues to be developed as an alternative to H.265 and VP9. While much progress is being made, it looks like another year of heavy development will be needed before Daala is ready for primetime...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Video-One-Year

  • #2
    Going off a tangent here, are there any players/phones/tablets that support opus?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BSDude View Post
      Going off a tangent here, are there any players/phones/tablets that support opus?
      Android devices support Opus natively as of Lollipop (see http://developer.android.com/about/v.../lollipop.html and http://developer.android.com/referen...diaFormat.html).

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      • #4
        Correction

        Daala is designed to be the codec for the NEXT generation. That is, the one AFTER vp9/hevc.
        That they require another year is no bad thing as they have time.
        What's worrying, to me, is that some of their (important) ideas haven't panned out.
        However, they seem to be ahead of everyone else, at this point, in realizing that dct/mpeg is dead. Hevc is, arguably,on the wrong side of the complexity/quality curve. Even playing back high bit rate (40Mb/s, or so) avc is far from easy using just software (requires a tremendous amount of simd code).

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        • #5
          Seriously, even if Daala gets ready in 2 years I think we're still very lucky given its (very) high quality and (very) likely not infringing on others patents.

          I actually thought it'll be ready by like 2020 because it's so radically different. So I think one year is too optimistic.

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          • #6
            I've gotta say...as far as the traditional FOSS community goes, Daala is the project that I find most exciting. I can't wait until they finish it and begin the process of ending proprietary codecs once and for all.

            Does anyone know at what point the theoritical maximum precieved video quality will be reached so that codec gains will begin to be used primarily for smaller file sizes rather than higher quality? I've searched around and I can't quite find an answer.

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            • #7
              Sucks that this means the next generation of devices and pretty much all 4k content will be h265 uncontested. vp9 is just not that good, and mpegla has too much lobbying power for it to be a contest with the performance metrics on their side.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by zanny View Post
                Sucks that this means the next generation of devices and pretty much all 4k content will be h265 uncontested. vp9 is just not that good, and mpegla has too much lobbying power for it to be a contest with the performance metrics on their side.
                I don't know a lot about h265, but I tried x265 last month and it wasn't that better than x264 although it was way slower. Do you know where can I found tests and comparisons about h265 vs vp9 ? Is x265 the better h265 encoder?

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                • #9
                  Can't wait for Daala. Hopefully it will be accepted by HTML5 and WebRTC.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Prescience500 View Post
                    Does anyone know at what point the theoritical maximum precieved video quality will be reached so that codec gains will begin to be used primarily for smaller file sizes rather than higher quality? I've searched around and I can't quite find an answer.
                    Lossless codecs already exist, humans have different abilities. If you mean something like a genetic maximum, I don't know of any research to one, but would guess it wouldn't differ much from lossless.

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