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Microsoft To Open-Source .NET, Bring It Officially To Linux

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  • reCAPTCHA
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    I work in Java professionally because I have kids and none of my other skills can pull in an equivalent amount of money. I don't know that I can ditch the Java ecosystem professionally - maybe if I lived closer to Silicon Valley, Seattle, NYC, or some other major development hub it would be an option. But I'm hoping that in a few years I'll be able to switch from Java + Maven to either Groovy + Gradle or Clojure + Leiningen. Now if only I could pull myself away from pointless web forum discussions long enough to master one of those skill sets.
    Really don't know why responding to someone with such silly attitude towards java. He obviously had issues to grasp it, but he talks about other dumb kids, which are btw a quite important factor in business (Yeah I know, Companies should hire only C++, or Assembler developers, who understand arch, have full control over... you know, and can optimize, to code backend, instead of caring about reality and making money by finishing projects on time.).

    When you speak about Groovy and Clojure, that is the same area as Python, Rubby, or even PHP, as I see it, so you would have to jump to Java here and there, depending on how much backend performance you need... Important part about Java is that it can be quite fast, and this is probably one of the reasons you will find it in Telecom companies and all those who rely on performance. On the other side people are forced to use frameworks like Hibernate etc., even in companies like a Telecom, which is totally insane IMO.

    Regarding 'dumb kids', I see it also as a nice plus, b/c you can easy find cheap working stuff with some basics at least, and while it is not that easy to become a pro, it is easier than to find a developer who is really proficient in C#/ .Net (Not to strat typing about vendor lock in, MS as a company, Windows as a platform etc.).
    From my experience, a lot of experienced, smart, JEE developers, have issues when confronted with SCJP questions, so as I see it, it is not that easy to become a java guru, but hey, C++ teenagers, game developers wannabes knows programming.

    Leave a comment:


  • asavah
    replied
    systemd-dotnetd please!

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  • Michael_S
    replied
    Originally posted by prodigy_ View Post
    Yeah, and I'll tell you why. Corporations want to cheapskate on software development unless it's something they can sell. They hire total dumbasses who are too dumb to understand anything but Java and since Java itself is one of the worst PL ever invented any code they manage to produce is a very definition of trash.

    Now I have nothing against Java on Android - in old times kids played with Basic now they can have another toy. But it's my dream that everything that belongs to enterprise and has even a piece of Java in it will one day be a part of a huge pile... burning bright.
    I work in Java professionally because I have kids and none of my other skills can pull in an equivalent amount of money. I don't know that I can ditch the Java ecosystem professionally - maybe if I lived closer to Silicon Valley, Seattle, NYC, or some other major development hub it would be an option. But I'm hoping that in a few years I'll be able to switch from Java + Maven to either Groovy + Gradle or Clojure + Leiningen. Now if only I could pull myself away from pointless web forum discussions long enough to master one of those skill sets.

    Leave a comment:


  • YoungManKlaus
    replied
    great news. .net and c# are a really convenient framework and language.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pajn
    replied
    This is great. C# is a beautilful language and ASP.NET with friends is a wounderful framework.
    When portabillity is fixed and JetBrains provides an IDE it will be a very interessting platform.

    Leave a comment:


  • prodigy_
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    Java is at worst a wildly popular piece of shit.
    Yeah, and I'll tell you why. Corporations want to cheapskate on software development unless it's something they can sell. They hire total dumbasses who are too dumb to understand anything but Java and since Java itself is one of the worst PL ever invented any code they manage to produce is a very definition of trash.

    Now I have nothing against Java on Android - in old times kids played with Basic now they can have another toy. But it's my dream that everything that belongs to enterprise and has even a piece of Java in it will one day be a part of a huge pile... burning bright.

    Leave a comment:


  • curaga
    replied
    Well, things became interesting. Waiting patiently for the next move. Good thing Phoronix Premium comes with all-you-need popcorn.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael_S
    replied
    Originally posted by prodigy_ View Post
    Java is a piece of shit.
    Java is at worst a wildly popular piece of shit.

    And the JVM, many of the other programming languages that run on the JVM, and much of the enormous selection of JVM-compatible code libraries available through Maven Central are excellent. Even if you hate the language - and there's plenty to hate, I should know, I'm avoiding Java code to write this post - it gave birth to some excellent stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • yakman2020
    replied
    Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
    Insofar as I've understood .Net is a platform and not a language like Java. Maybe you were meaning JVM?
    .Net includes the idea of "managed code", which runs in the same manner as a JIT JVM, even if the program is compiled for that archictecture.

    The interesting thing here, as in the devil is in the details, is the boundary between system COM objects on one hand, and .Net on the other. No windows program is completely ".Net".

    Will they ultimately implement the system objects (for things like SQL, logical volume management, etc) in open source?

    BTW, the reason for doing this is to get enterprise IT people to get used to using .net. Windows is currently something of an underdog in the server world, just as it is in phone.

    Leave a comment:


  • DataPath
    replied
    I see this as a strategy to make it more likely for people to write their mobile apps in C# and bring them back to Xbox and winphone. If they can get more mobile apps written in .NET, they probably figure they can get more apps ported back to their own platform.

    Leave a comment:

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