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Adobe Brings Streaming Photoshop To Chromebooks

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Ibidem View Post
    My understanding is that the latest version of of Photoshop is "cloud-based" on all platforms, so Linux gets what everyone else gets.
    The catch is that most people who use Photoshop (as far as I can tell) are really unhappy about the new version, since cloud-based is a subscription-based always-online mess.
    It has cloud based storage and is a a subscription service, but the programs (Photoshop etc...) are certainly not cloud based at the moment, they are full desktop programs that require no streaming or internet connection to run (but you will have to connect to update etc...)

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    • #12
      Originally posted by zeealpal View Post
      It has cloud based storage and is a a subscription service, but the programs (Photoshop etc...) are certainly not cloud based at the moment, they are full desktop programs that require no streaming or internet connection to run (but you will have to connect to update etc...)
      Thanks for the information.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by phoronix View Post
        Phoronix: Adobe Brings Streaming Photoshop To Chromebooks

        Adobe's popular Photoshop software landed on Linux sort of today with a streaming version that will be available to Chromebook users running Chrome OS...

        http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTgwMDE
        Fuck Adobe and fuck Google.

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        • #14
          Well they brought googlewebdesigner lately to linux so mayber there's hope. chromeos? never heard of...

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Kivada View Post
            Fuck Adobe and fuck Google.
            and fuck meaningful contributions.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by erendorn View Post
              and fuck meaningful contributions.
              Adobe's Linux support has gone from shit to non existent and their software is riddled with security holes.

              Google cannot and should not be trusted as one of the word's most capable spying organizations.

              Fuck both of them.

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              • #17
                Use GIMP instead cloud editors where spying is a concern

                Originally posted by Kivada View Post
                Adobe's Linux support has gone from shit to non existent and their software is riddled with security holes.

                Google cannot and should not be trusted as one of the word's most capable spying organizations.

                Fuck both of them.
                That's a good reason to use GIMP-as good as any. On the other hand, I would not publicly trash anyone for deciding to support some form of Linux, even if my security requirements or non-use of money for software forbid use of their products. I don't play any paid games, but you will never hear me condemn Steam for deciding to make themselves available to Linux users, given the danger not only to them but to so many others if MS had decided to lock applications to a Windows store in a future version of that OS.

                No matter what I think of Google and Adobe, if the timing of when I knock them is everytime they decide to support Linux, what example is set for OTHER companies deciding to support or not support Linux, maybe even to open or not open their code in the process?

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Luke View Post
                  That's a good reason to use GIMP-as good as any. On the other hand, I would not publicly trash anyone for deciding to support some form of Linux, even if my security requirements or non-use of money for software forbid use of their products. I don't play any paid games, but you will never hear me condemn Steam for deciding to make themselves available to Linux users, given the danger not only to them but to so many others if MS had decided to lock applications to a Windows store in a future version of that OS.

                  No matter what I think of Google and Adobe, if the timing of when I knock them is everytime they decide to support Linux, what example is set for OTHER companies deciding to support or not support Linux, maybe even to open or not open their code in the process?
                  Those companie's take away from criticism should be to not engage in such practices. If EA or Ubisoft came to Linux I'd tell them to fuck off with their intrusive DRM, bad business practices and terrible games, just as Itold CDPojectRed to fuck off with their garbage eON "port" of The Witcher 2.

                  Do it right or not at all.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Temar View Post
                    LOL, I really like Krita and use it a lot, but Photoshop is lightyears ahead of Krita. I don't want to speak ill of Krita, it is a great software. Still, Adobe has the bigger development team and a headstart of about a decade.
                    No lol: There's actually a grain of truth in this.

                    Big photography teams probably continue to work with photoshop because that's a very good software for their very peculiar needs. They aren't the one running Krita or GIMP. But they aren't the ones who'll run a cloud version of photoshop either.

                    On the other hand, you have all the amateurs, who use photoshop (probably pirate it) for very simple tasks, simply because that's what the pros are using and because they can easily find tutorials on-line. They do very simple task (like removing red eyes from last vacations' photos), some of which are so simple that they could have been done in MS Paint or some are even being done automatically in some camera's firmware (some camera have post-process anti red eye in addition to the classical pre-flash).

                    These guys are the target of such version. It in these market that Krita, GIMP and even Paint.NET are eating Photoshop's lunch. Specially with the more recent efforts against software piracy, users wanting to avoid problems and go legit face the choice of either shelling out the price for Photoshop, or keep paying nothing by switching to software that actually costs nothing.

                    That's the target audience for a cheap cloud streamed photoshop. The "vacation" guy could pay his/her subscription only in the time following the return from vacations and not the rest of the year.

                    Whereas, in addition, a Photoshop subscription may also come handy for the big photography company, so some artist could quickly check something on a chromebook while travelling before getting back at their workstation/workhorse big laptop. Specially if a couple of such subscription come packaged together with the enterprise-wide contract for photoshop. That could be a nice side effect. But still I suspect that the main target audience is the random casual user, with the goal being having these users still pay some money to adobe just to remove red eyes instead of going for cheaper (free) alternatives.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by DrYak View Post
                      No lol: There's actually a grain of truth in this.

                      Big photography teams probably continue to work with photoshop because that's a very good software for their very peculiar needs. They aren't the one running Krita or GIMP. But they aren't the ones who'll run a cloud version of photoshop either.

                      On the other hand, you have all the amateurs, who use photoshop (probably pirate it) for very simple tasks, simply because that's what the pros are using and because they can easily find tutorials on-line. They do very simple task (like removing red eyes from last vacations' photos), some of which are so simple that they could have been done in MS Paint or some are even being done automatically in some camera's firmware (some camera have post-process anti red eye in addition to the classical pre-flash).

                      These guys are the target of such version. It in these market that Krita, GIMP and even Paint.NET are eating Photoshop's lunch. Specially with the more recent efforts against software piracy, users wanting to avoid problems and go legit face the choice of either shelling out the price for Photoshop, or keep paying nothing by switching to software that actually costs nothing.

                      That's the target audience for a cheap cloud streamed photoshop. The "vacation" guy could pay his/her subscription only in the time following the return from vacations and not the rest of the year.

                      Whereas, in addition, a Photoshop subscription may also come handy for the big photography company, so some artist could quickly check something on a chromebook while travelling before getting back at their workstation/workhorse big laptop. Specially if a couple of such subscription come packaged together with the enterprise-wide contract for photoshop. That could be a nice side effect. But still I suspect that the main target audience is the random casual user, with the goal being having these users still pay some money to adobe just to remove red eyes instead of going for cheaper (free) alternatives.
                      Photoshop Elements, I had gotten the 2.0 version free with an old Epson scanner, the retail price as like $100 USD for it, yet it still to this day has more features then I've ever needed and Gimp has at the very least matched it feature for feature from a general user point of view.

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