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FSF Issues Their Rebuttal To Apple's New iPhone, Watch & Apple Pay

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Spittie View Post
    I swear, I don't even like iOS and the iPhone, but you people just have to write the dumbest things and make me defend Apple.



    That's because Android cover the whole market, while iPhones only cover the top-end.
    Actually, they cater explicitely to the LOW end. It is not a power-user's device and would not satisfy someone genuinely needing a high end device. They're about FASHION, not about anything useful.

    It's a marketing choice, Apple just decided that pursuing the low-end low-revenue market is not in their interests.
    Which is actually a massive marketing BLUNDER on their part, since you can make more money on volume than on a few over priced sucker items.
    What do you think makes more money? Toyota or Ferrari?

    What? That's just not true. First, they don't have a new name, the A8 is called Cyclone just like the A7.
    Old name: A7.
    New name: A8.

    Second, the clock speed alone doesn't mean a thing. The A8 destroy everything ARM at IPC. Its single-core performance is much, much better, even with a low clock speed. Which is a good thing, since it reduces power usage.
    Third, "weak 64bit"? wtf? Apple implements AARCH64, which is the architecture from ARM. Which is implemented in every 64bit core, like the Cortex A7.
    Fourth, 2 big, powerful cores > 4/8 small cores. Apple so far is the only one that gets it, but there is hope with Nvidia's Denver. More cores is just a gimmick for the Asian market. Most phone applications need great single-threaded performance, just like most desktop applications. This isn't likely to change soon, and when it will Apple will add more cores.
    You're dreaming.

    "weak-ass". Sure, the iPhone GPU can't compete with an Adreno 410 (Snapdragon 805), but with the ~50% boost in the iPhone 6 can easily compete with the Adreno 330 (Snapdragon 800/801), which is the one included in most current flagships.
    Correction... most of LAST YEAR's high end.

    Apple is, again, the only one getting it so far. The race to "moar dpi" is stupid. The screen quality is much more important than the dpi (once you have enough of them), and Apple is king in it.
    Also, the "low-res screen" allow them to have better performance and better battery life with no impact on the end user. You might see the difference between ~300dpi and ~500dpi when you have the two screen side by side, but ~300dpi is more than enough for daily usage. You won't see the pixels, trust me, and it's still pretty fucking sharp.
    You're missing the point. The fact that a modern GPU can drive a QHD means that it can absolutely SCREAM with a 1080p.
    And actually, APPLE was the one to INITIATE the whole race to high resolution. What they did wrong is that they started something they couldn't finish.

    As far as their screen QUALITY goes... its no different than any other LCD. The big quality difference you are talking about actually comes from things like AMOLED (samsuck), which is absolutely HORRIBLE quality, since it pretty much LIES about its resolution, but takes as much GPU to support as a genuine high resolution display would. It comes down to PenTile RGBG, which gives full resolution in the GREEN color ONLY, leaving the red and blue at HALF the resolution they advertise. Not only that, but AMOLED is just plain BAD at accurately reproducing colors. They look washed out and flat.

    It's an incremental update, as always. Bigger screen (might be an improvement or not, depending on your preferences), better cpu, better gpu, better battery life, better camera, thinner.
    Except that its NOT an increment. Screen size, like you mention, can actually be worse. CPU is the same, GPU is the same (crap), battery life on an apple? Same camera... thinner? By HALF OF ONE MILLIMETER! You need a fucking micrometer to measure the difference.

    You know, it's the standard in the Android world. For example, what did the HTC One M8 bring over the M7? The stuff I've just written up there.
    Um, lets see... M8 has snapdragon 800 vs 600 in M7. That is a genuine actual MASSIVE difference, both in performance and in power consumption.

    Yes, some/many of there things are catching up to Android. Is that a bad thing? I can see it as a "finally, fucking welcome to 2014", not as a "it's shit since they've added this feature X years later".
    More like "welcome to 2012, we're going to sell you the same thing that we already sold you last year, which was already outdated then."

    And in all that comment, you still managed to miss the only real complain about the 6, which is the rumored no upgrade to ram. Congrats.
    So you want me to keep listing all the things that haven't changed? Has to end somewhere. But sure, if you really want to mention it, iJunk6 has very little RAM.
    But frankly, who cares? It'll do what they tell you to do, which is about as much as you can expect from a fashion accessory.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by drspinderwalf View Post
      A fellow wire-trick HTC owner. Yep, my old Sensation took an awful lot of pain to get fully unlocked. Before that, my Hero pained me for quite some time before getting unlocked. In contrast, my wife had her Galaxy S4 taken care of within an hour.

      The whole smartphone situation is absurd in the end. AOSP+FDroid is quite enjoyable for me to use, but I really feel that AOSP-based ROMs are just kinda floundering until Google gets the next part done. I'd be happier with Tizen/Ubuntu/Debian, particularly because I don't have a clue how updates work in the Android world... am I supposed to assume that I'm safe just because I'm running 4.4.4? I don't feel particularly safe when updates have months of silence. Perhaps it's my ignorance but it doesn't smell right to me.
      4.4.4 isn't so stable that it won't change until the next dump from Google. There are updates/patches/fixes being added in all the time.... but you need to watch the GIT to see what they are and when they hit. Subjecting yourself to a 3rd party "build" (whether it be from samsung, cyanogenmod, or some random hacker you met on a forum) basically puts your trust into them to keep track of security updates.

      And I'll tell you this; they really aren't watching.

      Google tends to push out new builds for Nexus hardware whenever they note a significant security vulnerability. Sometimes that means an update from (for example) 4.4.4 --> 4.4.5, other times they use an even more minor identifier, like 4.4.4_2.

      And then we have the issues with proprietary radio firmware...
      As I've already mentioned, that does not go away with tizen/ubuntu/whatever. This is really in the hands of the radio manufacturer, typically Qualcomm for the majority of devices.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by zog6 View Post
        As far as I know replicant android does not function properly (i.e. all the hardware works) on any smart phone. So recommending replicant when this is the case causes more harm than good.
        You're missing the point. Some people want to be 100% open source even at the cost of some functionality. That's what FSF provides guidelines for.

        You want binary blobs - it's your decision. Nobody is stopping you from using CyanogenMod (or even stock firmware for that matter).

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by drspinderwalf View Post
          I'd be happier with Tizen/Ubuntu/Debian, particularly because I don't have a clue how updates work in the Android world... am I supposed to assume that I'm safe just because I'm running 4.4.4? I don't feel particularly safe when updates have months of silence. Perhaps it's my ignorance but it doesn't smell right to me.
          That's something Apple has over Google. When you buy an Android phone you're at the manufacturers mercy in terms of firmware updates. HTC for example has left a number of their devices behind with Gingerbread while Apple happily applies updates for their devices. Though Apple users with jailbreak will tell you that Apples updates are a nightmare to deal with. Problem with both Android and iOS is that updates are done in chunks. So if there's a major security hole in either OS you'll have a hell of a time getting an update. Unlike Windows, OSX, and Linux where small updates are given often to fix these security holes.

          But of course on Android the lack of updates are mostly due to manufacturers using new Android versions as a selling point for newer phones. Which is why a lot of Android phones manufacturers went to great lengths to lock down phones.

          Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
          Hmm?
          s-off doesn't actually get you anything appreciable compared to what the htc website gets you in their unlock.
          But yeah, doubleshot sure was a mess. Not really sure why HTC went super-lock on things. I dealt with one of those for my wife for a while, then decided it wasn't worth messing with and ditched it for a hammerhead. My personal last HTC was the first one they tried to superlock, and therefore the only one that got super-unlocked -- Vision.
          S-OFF is needed to be able to replace the kernel. Without S-OFF you have to go through a lot of crap to install new roms, and even then without the benefits of a new kernel.

          I also have my HTC Vision which was a pain but I still like it. It's my backup phone but I don't know why when sometimes I feel it's better then my doubleshot.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
            4.4.4 isn't so stable that it won't change until the next dump from Google. There are updates/patches/fixes being added in all the time.... but you need to watch the GIT to see what they are and when they hit. Subjecting yourself to a 3rd party "build" (whether it be from samsung, cyanogenmod, or some random hacker you met on a forum) basically puts your trust into them to keep track of security updates.

            And I'll tell you this; they really aren't watching.
            I assume as much - the question is how much you want to pain yourself with security - for me, my ROM works fine enough for F-Droid apps and web browsing (things like finding recipes or reading news - any serious work is done on a laptop or desktop).

            Google tends to push out new builds for Nexus hardware whenever they note a significant security vulnerability. Sometimes that means an update from (for example) 4.4.4 --> 4.4.5, other times they use an even more minor identifier, like 4.4.4_2.


            As I've already mentioned, that does not go away with tizen/ubuntu/whatever. This is really in the hands of the radio manufacturer, typically Qualcomm for the majority of devices.
            What is concerning me is really how the whole ecosystem is handled - it's very messy and completely anti-user. Imagine having the security, stability, and convenience of a Desktop/Laptop Debian system for your phone. You set your mirror and you get updates on a regular basis, and (if it were achievable) a fully-FOSS system as defined by the DFSG.

            All in all, I basically only use my phone for owncloud calendar/contact/files sync, some basic navigation, and a fringe audio programming software project. Currently, AOSP serves me fairly well but I feel this is not sustainable, particularly as Google tries to wall up the Android sphere.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
              They have a new NAME for the same CPU, with a slightly boosted (but still low) clock speed. It may be 64bit, but its a weak 64bit, and only 2-core.
              They are high-quality dual core, there's no real need for quad core in smartphones currently, as long as the cores are good. 64 bit is not of much use currently, there's almost no Android phones using it either.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by phoronix View Post
                Phoronix: FSF Issues Their Rebuttal To Apple's New iPhone, Watch & Apple Pay

                John Sullivan, the Executive Director of the Free Software Foundation, has commented on Apple's much anticipated launch of the iPhone 6, Apple Pay, and the brand new product line: the Apple Watch...

                http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTc4NDU



                also check: http://theoatmeal.com/comics/apple

                Last edited by MartinN; 10 September 2014, 01:41 PM.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                  Android can actually be programmed to do that....
                  Pics or didn't happen.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by curaga View Post
                    Pics or didn't happen.
                    well if you insist http://bit.ly/IqT6zt

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by droidhacker View Post
                      CHOICE is about being able to rewrite the code to do what you want.
                      And do please learn a bit about what you are complaining about or you just look foolish. The so-called "android-auto" amounts to the equivalent of VNC. No google apps on your phone? Then also no google apps on your car screen.
                      I own a soft-top Wrangler. It's not designed for in-car enternaitnment When you're neck deep in mud and it starts pouring in through the door seals, the last thing you need be concerned about is that. I dont even have the cassette player anymore.

                      As for your intepretation of choice, you might want to visit a baker and ask for a loaf of bread. If they ask you any questions, you know what I'm talking about.

                      I dont code, and portability of code is YOUR choice, not mine. For me as a consumer, it's about the right tool for the job. I have a life to get on with and Android and Co. has been a minefield of privacy abuse and poorly written apps. There's the binary blob driver issue and locked hardware to consider even after going open source app's. Those closed apps want my details and use MY expensive connection to get it. Firewalls are nice. Shouldn't need them on a phone, though.
                      Hi

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