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  • Shuttleworth On Google Go, Unity 8, Ubuntu Phone, Etc

    Phoronix: Shuttleworth On Google Go, Unity 8, Ubuntu Phone, Etc

    At this week's virtual Ubuntu Developer Summit besides saying Mir will be the default on the Ubuntu desktop by 16.04 LTS and also saying systemd will be used when it's hardened (again by the 16.04 LTS time-frame) Mark had some other interesting comments...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTYyOTE

  • hooluupog
    replied
    IMO,Go+ qml is a better choice than python + gtk for developing gui apps.

    Leave a comment:


  • curaga
    replied
    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
    I am assuming he means the best development environment for a Linux Distribution? Cause not a goddamn candle in code development does Linux Hold to OS X or iOS.
    Way to imply coding on iOS is in any way enjoyable. *on*, not for.

    Leave a comment:


  • kneekoo
    replied
    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
    I am assuming he means the best development environment for a Linux Distribution? Cause not a goddamn candle in code development does Linux Hold to OS X or iOS.
    I have no idea how coding is in OS X because I never wrote code on that platform. All I know is what Mark said, that he knows tons/tens of people who use Ubuntu in VMs to code. How is coding in OS X?

    Leave a comment:


  • dee.
    replied
    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
    I am assuming he means the best development environment for a Linux Distribution? Cause not a goddamn candle in code development does Linux Hold to OS X or iOS.
    That has not been my experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • computerquip
    replied
    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
    I am assuming he means the best development environment for a Linux Distribution? Cause not a goddamn candle in code development does Linux Hold to OS X or iOS.
    Just out of curiosity, what makes you think that? I've found development on Linux rather easy going for most distributions given the pre-packaged tools and libraries that you can grab at a single command or even a few clicks.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisb
    replied
    Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
    Moving to a rolling release modell for the non-LTS releases would be the best thing to ever happen to Ubuntu. The non-LTS releases are simply idiotic there is no other way to say it.
    +1. Nobody cares about non-LTS releases, and afaics Ubuntu developers don't care for any release except the current one, and even then only because it had the latest packages, not as an actual install target for normal users. It would be a huge benefit to Ubuntu to have a rolling release that more closely tracks upstream package versions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marc Driftmeyer
    replied
    Originally posted by kneekoo View Post
    What Michael wrote in the news is correct but without the context it got misinterpreted - as if Ubuntu is a target platform. Mark was talking about the environment itself. Here it is, word for word:
    I am assuming he means the best development environment for a Linux Distribution? Cause not a goddamn candle in code development does Linux Hold to OS X or iOS.

    Leave a comment:


  • erendorn
    replied
    Originally posted by computerquip View Post
    For what it's worth (and @ litfan): http://www.ubuntu.com/about/about-ubuntu

    It's actually understandable to try not to use the word Linux all over the place simply because it confuses consumers. It's easier to say, "Ubuntu" than "Ubuntu Linux" to someone who isn't completely familiar with the genre of Linux.

    Let's try to keep notions realistic. Even if Linux isn't mentioned, there's reasoning behind it. Don't just assume it's to overthrow Linux (which won't happen even if they tried).
    We all know it's "Ubuntu Gnu/Linux".

    Leave a comment:


  • kneekoo
    replied
    Originally posted by litfan View Post
    Go to ubuntu.com and look for the word Linux. You won't find it.
    "you won't find Linux on ubuntu.com" is rather an exaggeration of some Ubuntu haters and some people believe that.

    Ubuntu Installation Guide
    1.1. What is Ubuntu?

    Ubuntu is a complete desktop Linux operating system...
    Then:
    1.2. What is Debian?
    1.3. What is GNU/Linux?

    Check debian.org's first page. If it wasn't for a news item including Linux in the title, you couldn't find the word either. And that's until a newer news comes up and this one will fade away.
    [28/09/2013] Debian Edu / Skolelinux Wheezy ? a complete Linux solution for your school
    I know, Ubuntu could be more careful to pay respect to its foundation, but if you look closely at the information presented on their pages, you'll notice they tend to shorten everything and simply highlight features and stuff. It's just advertising for people who need basic info about what Ubuntu can do, and that's OK. "Ubuntu operating system" is a correct statement. While everything revolves around Linux - the kernel - and the GNU toolchain, there's a whole lot more than just GNU/Linux. It's a huge ecosystem with tons of software. Although Ubuntu is based on Debian, it still has many essential differences regarding software choice, direction, development approach, culture and so on.

    I don't get why some people prefer to distance themselves from Ubuntu but at the same time they are preoccupied with having Ubuntu "acknowledge" their GNU/Linux foundation in the wordings of their website. You either care or don't care. Also, most of us say Linux and go with it, and when someone corrects us to say GNU/Linux, then eyes start rolling and RMS jokes/bashing tend to pop right up. It's like some people don't have anything better to do but complain.

    Some people are also against Ubuntu's direction and make a huge deal about it. Well, it's OK to have a personal opinion but you can't really expect anyone to do what you feel like. So they like reinventing the wheel and make upstart, Unity, Mir, go for convergence and stuff? So what? It's their time and money, not anyone else's. And as long as they publish their work as FOSS what is the problem? The license? Even if they ignore most of the code, the developers can anyway get inspiration from it, then write their own, original code. It's not a black box. Sure, it would be swell to have "everything Ubuntu" under GPL v2, the be perfectly compatible with the rest of the gang but again, it's their time and money. And if they fail to keep their creations alive, again it's their time and money. But if they actually come up with something really usable, then it's good for the users and developers alike.

    The whole GNU/Linux world is about diversity and freedom of choice. But is it just the user's freedom of choice or the developers should also be free to tinker whatever they feel like? Rhetorical question, obviously.

    I'm a Mint user, with MATE. I find Unity interesting to look at, but I feel more productive with MATE and the mint menu, so I don't touch Unity at all. That doesn't mean I have to cry about it or rant about Ubuntu not having Linux glued all over their website. I don't think that's a mature attitude. Most of us can actually do better, so let's get a grip and do so.

    Leave a comment:

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