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Raspberry Pi Serves Up A Tasty IPO On The London Stock Exchange

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  • #11
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post
    Once it normalizes I think it may be a wise investment as I think they may be primed for a purchase by NVIDIA or AMD.
    Why? Other than the Pico, all RPi models are nothing more than just SBCs with Broadcom chips. The SoC is the only thing of value, and Broadcom doesn't make anything that either Nvidia or AMD would have any interest in. Nvidia already makes ARM-based SBCs that are way better than anything Broadcom would ever make (Jetson) and AMD already makes platforms for POS machines (the main market Broadcom targets with their CPUs).

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    • #12
      how can a charity go on stock market?

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      • #13
        Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
        Y'know there's more out there than just RPi for ARM, right?
        Yup, have a half-dozen different ones (various models of ODROID, etc) in a cupboard. They were fun to play with at the time - had a little cluster with remote global storage to experiment with clustering, another SBC as a private git server - but way too many little quirks and random headaches which never got fixed, or got fixed with "buy the new one we just released".

        RPis lost my favour simply because of their pricing here - by the time I add a (not terrible) case, power adaptor and microSD, an 8GB RPi4 costs as much as an N100 mini-PC with 16GB RAM and a 256GB SSD right now! An RPi5 is about 10% cheaper than the same mini-PC as a barebones unit...

        RISC-V is still new and has all of the same issues, but being (at least in theory) more open, I hope to see it evolve into something a little more cohesive/coherent.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
          Y'know there's more out there than just RPi for ARM, right?
          Raspi's biggest selling point is their OS support. The support for linux on other SBCs is just downright crappy. Manufacturers flat-out don't provide support and community support is spotty at best.

          Meanwhile, on a traditional PC everything just works. It's a no-brainer compared to the continued shitshow of non-raspi SBCs.
          Last edited by Developer12; 12 June 2024, 01:49 AM.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
            Yup, have a half-dozen different ones (various models of ODROID, etc) in a cupboard. They were fun to play with at the time - had a little cluster with remote global storage to experiment with clustering, another SBC as a private git server - but way too many little quirks and random headaches which never got fixed, or got fixed with "buy the new one we just released".

            RPis lost my favour simply because of their pricing here - by the time I add a (not terrible) case, power adaptor and microSD, an 8GB RPi4 costs as much as an N100 mini-PC with 16GB RAM and a 256GB SSD right now! An RPi5 is about 10% cheaper than the same mini-PC as a barebones unit...

            RISC-V is still new and has all of the same issues, but being (at least in theory) more open, I hope to see it evolve into something a little more cohesive/coherent.
            The RISC-V *standard* is open. The chips are DEFINITELY NOT. There is nothing "open" about scifive's chips, for example. They even require proprietary blobs to do ram init, like the latest intel and AMD CPUs. Chinese chips are even worse, with nonexistent documentation.

            I don't know where people got the idea that RISC-V being an open standard would result in open hardware, but it really needs to end.
            Last edited by Developer12; 12 June 2024, 01:50 AM.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by etam View Post
              Soon Raspberry Pi's will become enshittified by the greed of shareholders.
              Virtually every piece of computer equipment you've ever owned or used was made by a company with greedy shareholders (whether or not they bought stock on a public exchange or were private equity holders). If Raspberry Pi is similarly enshittified maybe it will manage do better than barely keep up with other leading ARM SBCs!

              Think about this: if Raspberry Pi were to actually make their own SoC, they could cut ties with greedy Broadcom and actually get a decent iGPU, as well as not needing to make their own RP1 Southbridge. However, that sort of thing takes money! Maybe, they can actually afford to do it, now?

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Developer12 View Post
                Raspi's biggest selling point is their OS support. The support for linux on other SBCs is just downright crappy.
                Here's where the posters plugging Alder Lake N boards & mini-PCs have a point. One of the best things about them is that everything (including the GPU and video codecs) just works, and to a level that even the Pi cannot match!

                However, something to watch out for is that the power consumption of Alder Lake N can far exceed that of even the Pi 5. If you heavily restrict its power limits, you can keep it in the same ballpark, and it's still probably faster.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Developer12 View Post
                  I don't know where people got the idea that RISC-V being an open standard would result in open hardware, but it really needs to end.
                  For sure, some people got weird ideas about this. However, there's a kernel of truth in RISC-V being a free standard.

                  If ARM were to suddenly jack its licensing fees, like they're trying to do with Qualcomm, or do something unreasonable that amounts to extortion, people who've invested in the ARM ecosystem would be stuck having to pay whatever it costs to keep playing. On the flip side, if you're using RISC-V hardware and the manufacturer goes nuts, then you can just switch to a different system and there's no entity which can make such competition impractical or impossible.

                  Granted, it's a long-range and somewhat theoretical threat... unless you're in a country potentially subject to sanctions by other countries where a lot of this IP was developed.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Developer12 View Post
                    Raspi's biggest selling point is their OS support. The support for linux on other SBCs is just downright crappy. Manufacturers flat-out don't provide support and community support is spotty at best.

                    Meanwhile, on a traditional PC everything just works. It's a no-brainer compared to the continued shitshow of non-raspi SBCs.
                    I've had plenty of success and minimal fuss on non-RPi devices. There are of course some that had been difficult to work with, or where perhaps not 100% of the hardware was usable, but there's plenty of decent options out there when paired with the right OS. For example, I'm using a Rock 5B for my home server with Armbian, and it's been a pretty smooth experience.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by Robust0522 View Post
                      I don't think I will purchase another RaspberryPI. I really detest this turning their back on the mission that helped them get where they are. Even if I want to support a UK technology company. Of course they have claimed aren't, but going public necessarily means prioritising your shareholders over any greater good. Similar to companies who market themselves as open source and then close their licence when they have become successful.

                      It's one thing to prioritise people who have made a business using your product, I could charitably understand the logic behind that move. But it's clear now that this was a cynical choice made to ensure a successful IPO and not the success of the community built around the PI.
                      i think the time of RaspberryPI is over just compare RaspberryPI 5 with orange pi5...
                      orange pi5 is faster it was litterally years before pi5 on the market
                      pi5 is 16nm and orange pi 5 is 8nm.. this means RaspberryPI 5 is already outdated.
                      there is a 32GB ram model of the orange pi 5... does technically obsolete the RaspberryPI 5

                      the biggest downside of RaspberryPI 5 most people have you need a shild upgrade for a M.2 SSD slot

                      Orange Pi5 has a M.2 SSD slot by default.

                      also keep in mind some orange pi 5 have 2.5Gb Ethernet ports and RaspberryPI 5 only has 1Gb ports.

                      but this is all old story already because well Qualcomm Elite X is a much much better SOC for anyone who want an ARM system as desktop and notebook replacement...

                      there is a mini computer with Qualcomm Elite X and 32gb ram ,...for 999€,,,

                      the Qualcomm Elite X soc is produced in 4nm... why do you need a RaspberryPI ? only to save money ?

                      Phantom circuit Sequence Reducer Dyslexia

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