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GNOME Publishes Draft Of Five-Year Strategic Plan

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  • #11
    > Increase commercial and economic value of GNOME

    I wonder what this means.

    If this means getting compabjes to make apps for gnome, I don't see this happening with a C based toolkit.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by mxan View Post

      KDE project, meaning actual KDE developers and actual KDE community members, rather than some soulless foundation like GNOME. [/URL]
      Like I said before. The joke is on you. This is about GNOME foundation, not GNOME project.

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      • #13
        - Relate to bigger “outward” world by making GNOME directly relevant and attractive to many more diverse people
        Hope that includes people who want to use themes.

        Contrary to the popular belief that theming is an "unproductive waste of time", they actually have a practical use case. Not long ago I stumbled upon a Mastodon tweet of someone who has ASD and some sensory issues. They maintain their own red tinted GTK theme for years (despite Gnome making it more and more difficult), because otherwise using the computer becomes intolerable for them.
        Last edited by user1; 23 May 2024, 02:38 PM.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by misp View Post
          If this means getting compabjes to make apps for gnome, I don't see this happening with a C based toolkit.
          In all fairness, being in C is exactly what makes GTK able to have bindings to just about every major language out there. C++, Rust, C#, Go, Haskell, JavaScript... on the other hand with Qt you're pretty much stuck with only C++.

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          • #15
            With the huge amount of government funding, one would think they would spend it on something important, not conferences where you pat yourselves on the back among fans.

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            • #16
              The only thing that doesn't convince me is trying to expand the community, to do this however some GNOME policies would have to change, otherwise I don't see it as difficult for it to happen so magically.
              The reason why DE GTKs were born like mushrooms from GNOME 3 onwards is precisely because the community was ignored.
              I really struggle to see a reversal of the trend now, without distorting GNOME as it is today. If part of the community doesn't like the direction of a project, it's natural to see forks and people move away.​

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              • #17
                Originally posted by woddy View Post
                The only thing that doesn't convince me is trying to expand the community, to do this however some GNOME policies would have to change, otherwise I don't see it as difficult for it to happen so magically.
                The reason why DE GTKs were born like mushrooms from GNOME 3 onwards is precisely because the community was ignored.
                I really struggle to see a reversal of the trend now, without distorting GNOME as it is today. If part of the community doesn't like the direction of a project, it's natural to see forks and people move away.​
                When they say expanding the community, they don't mean getting more users... they mean getting on more companies. GNOME's community is not the average Joe and Jane - it's the likes of Red Hat, Collabora, Igalia, and Purism. Everyone else are just expendable outsiders who don't matter to the project, and the in-group of contributors have no trouble making it clear when they've decided you're not part of them.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by misp View Post
                  If this means getting compabjes to make apps for gnome, I don't see this happening with a C based toolkit.
                  That hasn't stopped 99% of the industry so far.

                  I found this the other day. Quite interesting.

                  https://sources.debian.org/stats/
                  • C - 41%
                  • C++ - 25.7%
                  • Others - Equally ~5%
                  In the industry, you do tend to see more Java/.NET.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by mxan View Post

                    In all fairness, being in C is exactly what makes GTK able to have bindings to just about every major language out there. C++, Rust, C#, Go, Haskell, JavaScript... on the other hand with Qt you're pretty much stuck with only C++.
                    As long as there is a C API one can use, it doesn't really matter if the core is in C, C++ or rust.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
                      With the huge amount of government funding, one would think they would spend it on something important, not conferences where you pat yourselves on the back among fans.
                      Nonsense. Not a single dollar from Sovereign Tech Fund is being spent on conferences since they are clearly earmarked for specific projects. Regardless of that, conferences are immensely helpful to bring people together and motivate people to work together. This is especially true for open source communities who don't have the benefit of face to face interactions all that often. This is why all of the non-profit open source foundations invest in them. I doubt you can name even a single one that doesn't.

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