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Mozilla Firefox 100 Now Available With Various Improvements

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  • #51
    Originally posted by Citan View Post
    "By default the scrollbar won't take space" YET another strike for stupidly self-centered UX wizards that know IT like the inner of their palm... *sigh*

    It's exactly as dickish a move as Dolphin's "hide menubar by default and deal with it suckers".
    They don't seem to realize how large even today is the population that still struggles with basic manipulations and rely on that kinda of visual helpers / tangible buttons to help them.

    And then they'll wonder why Firefox continues dropping...
    why don't you just stop complaining?!

    hum?!?

    do you even believe they'll hear you???

    don't you know "they know it better", already?!

    why do you think they focus on s***ty bugs and features instead of fixing important funcional bugs?!

    the problem is that there's no decent chrome alternative beside this...

    I had some hopes that Servo would see some work under LF... but no more...

    "oh but we lack devs"

    ->stop paying huge sums to high profile people and start getting those who's in it because they care - not for the pay roll...

    oh wait, that's just me... also complaining...

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    • #52
      I read the "Everything New in Firefox 100 on Desktop and Mobile"article, and found the article completely misleads readers into believing Firefox (and Google Chrome) are the direct successors, born from the famous Netscape browser.

      The truth, Firefox and Google Chrome were forks/successors of Mozilla Seamonkey browser. The article likely seemingly purposely tries to further bury Seamonkey from public view. In my opinion, Firefox's and Chrome's user interfaces really became far more dysfunctional in comparison to Netscape/Seamonkey browser. I still prefer Seamonkey due to it's ease of use, much unlike in comparison to Microsoft's IE.

      Odd, the decline of browser interface functionality seemingly occurred following Microsoft IE browser's decline. Guessing, lack of competition encourages open source developers to screw-up more often! ;-)

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      • #53
        Originally posted by rogerx View Post
        I read the "Everything New in Firefox 100 on Desktop and Mobile"article, and found the article completely misleads readers into believing Firefox (and Google Chrome) are the direct successors, born from the famous Netscape browser.

        The truth, Firefox and Google Chrome were forks/successors of Mozilla Seamonkey browser. The article likely seemingly purposely tries to further bury Seamonkey from public view. In my opinion, Firefox's and Chrome's user interfaces really became far more dysfunctional in comparison to Netscape/Seamonkey browser. I still prefer Seamonkey due to it's ease of use, much unlike in comparison to Microsoft's IE.

        Odd, the decline of browser interface functionality seemingly occurred following Microsoft IE browser's decline. Guessing, lack of competition encourages open source developers to screw-up more often! ;-)
        While Firefox is a distant fork of Netscape and Chrome is distant fork of Konqueror, you have to understand that right now it is Firefox team and Chrome(ium) team that are doing the majority or all of the active development on the web render engine. We only have 3 major web render engines left that websites may care and support after Microsoft gave up their own. All other people could only choose to adopt one of them or remain a hobby project as website support would be hit-or-miss. In this sense, Seamonkey is just a Firefox clone with an older skin.

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        • #54
          Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post

          recently in germany ...me waiting in foreigners registration office.

          Me waiting
          Clerk typing...
          *Supervisor passes by*
          Clerk "Oh its good to see you boss.. could you show me where to switch on the printer?"
          Supervisor "*rolling eyes* Mrs. XYZ ...I have multiple times showed you the button"
          .....

          True story!
          So true. And they whine and complain they can't switch to Linux because of all the re-education needed (and of course "special" programs, where every community has a ton of custom "solutions" (patchwork rather)).
          But then, UI changes happen everywhere and also on W32. And this delays such a lot of things.
          No matter if power user or ... not very computer literate users... changes to the UI and workflow are often a pain, because most are "improvements for the worse".

          People do have one legitimate demand: Get the job done. Simple as that. And coders should give them the tools for it, but not mess up, break or change the tools constantly.
          Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

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          • #55
            What reason is there nowadays to still use Firefox on Linux?
            There's Chromium, or even Chromium-ungoogled if you wanna be totally detached from Google.
            Both work splendidly on Linux, and have just as much (or more) extensions as Firefox (OK, for Chromium-ungoogled some simple tweaks are necessary to install and update an extension). And they're faster and more stable.
            Not trolling, just genuinely interested.

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            • #56
              Originally posted by vladimir86 View Post

              To be fair, installing 3 antivirus programs in your computer, I'll say it is not being tech savvy. l. Having to tell you constantly how to press a button is just being stupid.
              I'll invoke Douglas Adams here.....

              "What do you mean you've never been to Alpha Centauri? Oh, for heaven's sake, mankind, it's only four light years away, you know. I'm sorry, but if you can't be bothered to take an interest in local affairs, that's your own lookout. Energize the demolition beam. I don't know, apathetic bloody planet, I've no sympathy at all."

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              • #57
                Originally posted by ezst036 View Post
                Is the RDD/VA-API hardware acceleration bug still an issue in Firefox 100?

                https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1751363
                Well, I am testing Firefox 100, and no vaapi yet..
                its not acelerated.

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by joopbraak View Post
                  What reason is there nowadays to still use Firefox on Linux?
                  There's Chromium, or even Chromium-ungoogled if you wanna be totally detached from Google.
                  Both work splendidly on Linux, and have just as much (or more) extensions as Firefox (OK, for Chromium-ungoogled some simple tweaks are necessary to install and update an extension). And they're faster and more stable.
                  Not trolling, just genuinely interested.
                  1. Firefox's WebExtensions API was a superset of the Chrome/Chromium extension API, even before Google decided to "improve" it in ways ad-blocking extensions lamented as making it more difficult for them to do their jobs.
                  2. Firefox has about:config, which lets you do things like re-enabling display of http:// in the address bar
                  3. While not as versatile as traditional extensions, Firefox still has userChrome.css, which can be used to achieve UI customizations that would require patching and recompiling Chromium.

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by joopbraak View Post
                    What reason is there nowadays to still use Firefox on Linux?
                    There's Chromium, or even Chromium-ungoogled if you wanna be totally detached from Google.
                    Both work splendidly on Linux, and have just as much (or more) extensions as Firefox (OK, for Chromium-ungoogled some simple tweaks are necessary to install and update an extension). And they're faster and more stable.
                    Not trolling, just genuinely interested.
                    Honestly? Every.
                    From the most "user-centric, egotistical" reasons to the most "help world be better" ones...

                    - Chrome is still shitty enough to not have a proper way of handling tabs (only one extension being like 10% of what Tree Style Tabs provide). And unless your browsing is limited to "check the same 5-10 sites every day", the classic horizontal single-bar is absolutely not enough.

                    - Chrome has the robustness under load of a 140-year old granny... Yeah, not much. Starts being laggy/hiccupy past 30-40 tabs depending on the level of shittiness (code-wise) of the websites you consult. Becomes unresponsive or crashes before the 100 mark. Although I usually keep number of tabs around 200 pike over a day, it happens quite often in the most intensive weeks to need to keep lots of "backplate tabs" to process later, so my session ramps up to 400-500 easily middle of week. Firefox loads that in a matter of seconds and sustains easily. For kicks I let myself snowball two weeks to see "how far it could go", went up to 1200 tabs session... And Firefox still took it in (Tree Style Tabs struggled a bit though xd).

                    - Firefox still has an ecosystem of extensions far superior to Chrome overall. Of course everyone don't need all of them, and actually most people don't use most than a handful ones that probably exist similarly on both browsers (tabs excepted). Still, it's extremely pleasant whenever you have some need, either niche or standard, to know that someone probably was kind enough to make an extension for that.

                    - Firefox is really close to Chrome in rendering speed. Sure, "dick competition" tests show off differences, but most of them are completely irrelevant in actual, daily life browsing. Because (sadly) more and more websites are not optimized (or even "counter-optimised" if you see what I mean) so the computation differences are all overrun by the time you're simply waiting for resources to load or things like that.

                    - You keep competition and diversity in browsing's ecosystem: it's better for technological advancement (different ways to tackle problems), it's better for societal stability (you *really* don't want a single company holding all keys to a critical aspect of IT). And it's even more important right now that we actually start living in such a world, with more and more people developing for Chrome only using half-baked libraries of half-thought custom code causing problems in Firefox. We're seriously on the verge of going back to the dark age of "one browser to rule them all", and the fact it's Google instead of Microsoft this time around isn't an improvement.

                    - You support a team that pushed through and overthrew Internet Explorer by the sheer quality of its product, instead of supporting an entity that used the exact same border-illegal techniques to propagate its browser (ninja-install when users installs a completely unrelated free software, forcing the "sets as defaults", etc).
                    Last edited by Citan; 19 May 2022, 05:42 AM.

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                    • #60
                      I want to ask a random question from you what is best in your view, Mozilla or google?

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