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FSF Calls Software Patents A Disease Amid COVID-19 Crisis, USPTO A Super-Spreader

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  • gerddie
    replied
    Originally posted by vladpetric View Post

    What medical software patents? Can you quote some?

    This is not about a hypothetical.
    For example Image registration and image segmentation is used in medical image processing (think processing images acquired by using Computer Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Tomography), and there are many patents related to this:

    Search and read the full text of patents from around the world with Google Patents, and find prior art in our index of non-patent literature.

    Search and read the full text of patents from around the world with Google Patents, and find prior art in our index of non-patent literature.


    Incidentally, lung CT images can be used to diagnose COVID-19, and using these methods could be used to automatize and simplify part of this diagnosis.


    Leave a comment:


  • Danny3
    replied
    The whole US patent system is just garbage.

    Hearing that they patent every little thing, even match is insane and makes me have no trust in them at all.
    In any case software patents are stupid and should not even exist.

    Leave a comment:


  • rabcor
    replied
    FSF used to stand for something, now that they managed to kick Richard Stallman out somehow, it's just a sjw ragemob, if you were expecting the FSF to ever do or claim anything sensible ever again, get ready to have your hopes dashed, because it ain't gonna happen.

    Leave a comment:


  • FPScholten
    replied
    Historical data shows that whenever a (new) technology is patented the development of this technology completely stops until the patent has expired or is lifted. Thus patenting software is a great way to halt software development. Only those developers working for the patent owners are allowed to develop and only in way the patent holder defines. It is all about control and profit (money).

    Sometimes there are some sane people holding patents that realize this and make their patents free for everyone to use. A fairly recent example of this is Tesla, by releasing their patents they paved the way for other manufacturers and car developers to expand the development and use of electric cars and other technology based on their patents i.e. batteries and electric drive mechanisms.

    Leave a comment:


  • insilications
    replied
    Originally posted by vladpetric View Post
    As much as I dislike software patents, comparing it to something that's killed ~500k people (official numbers; real numbers from China/Iran/Russia are likely much higher) in ~5 months and worldwide shows no signs of abating, is highly inappropriate.
    Keep in mind that there's also the Bilski vs Kappos decision, which does reduce the bite of software patents.
    We live in times where every moral crusader is supercharging and overloading their arguments with such types of exaggerated comparisons, trying to paint their adversaries as monsters. I tend to dislike software patents, but this kind of reasoning is getting old. It tends to make people view your argument in a bad light.

    How about just stating that patents in this context are harmful to actual patients? A good utilitarian argument based on costs and benefits is enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • vladpetric
    replied
    Originally posted by c117152 View Post


    It's not a metaphorical / seemly comparison: The medical software patents are preventing researchers from doing their jobs by restricting access to certain necessary features. Imagine having static analysis exclusively tied to a certain proprietary compiler: How many bugs would end up in critical systems?
    What medical software patents? Can you quote some?

    This is not about a hypothetical.

    Leave a comment:


  • c117152
    replied

    Originally posted by vladpetric View Post
    As much as I dislike software patents, comparing it to something that's killed ~500k people (official numbers; real numbers from China/Iran/Russia are likely much higher) in ~5 months and worldwide shows no signs of abating, is highly inappropriate.

    Keep in mind that there's also the Bilski vs Kappos decision, which does reduce the bite of software patents.
    It's not a metaphorical / seemly comparison: The medical software patents are preventing researchers from doing their jobs by restricting access to certain necessary features. Imagine having static analysis exclusively tied to a certain proprietary compiler: How many bugs would end up in critical systems?

    Leave a comment:


  • hvis
    replied
    Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
    Usually people who create libre type products dont have the resources to fight back to contest a USPTO decision, so the FSF is rising up to combat a general rip off of the libre community.
    Not just of the libre community. Proprietary vendors will be also at risk, though perhaps to a somewhat lower extent, in cases where it might be harder to notice/prove that a closed program "infringes", for some kinds of patents.

    Leave a comment:


  • hvis
    replied
    It doesn't say patents are worse than Covid, and it doesn't blame USPTO for Covid either.

    Have you read the post? It's very sensible.

    Leave a comment:


  • edwaleni
    replied
    I think (if I understand this correctly) is that the USPTO is in a rush to patent items related to fighting back on COVID are instead getting swamped with people submitting applications for items that were already designed for free use. (either via 3d print or through special chemical processes in microbiology)

    With the USG "fast tracking" so much process to get a COVID cure people are doing what people do when the government gets in a hurry. They commit fraud.

    Usually people who create libre type products dont have the resources to fight back to contest a USPTO decision, so the FSF is rising up to combat a general rip off of the libre community.

    Leave a comment:

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