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Linus Torvalds Switches To AMD Ryzen Threadripper After 15 Years Of Intel Systems

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  • #91
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    AM4 can use up to 128 GB (4x banks of 32GB UDIMM), which is already pretty damn high as is.
    FWIW, loading up both slots per channel with dual-rank, double-sided DIMMs is going to hurt your memory clock speeds, which are probably a bottleneck on a CPU like 3950X.

    If someone were going to spend that much on RAM, it'd be worth considering stepping up to the TR platform and also doubling your bandwidth.

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    • #92
      Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
      The only time the rich get free stuff is when it's mutually beneficial. Endorsement, product placement, etc. has tremendous marketing reach.
      Ironically, it's a better endorsement when someone of elite skill spends their limited resources on an accessory critical to their pursuit. That tells you it's a product they believe in so much that they potentially made sacrifices to use it. However, most with this celebrity status can't really be described as having limited resources (or at least aren't perceived as such).

      In Linus' case, you get half of that. There's the value in him using it simply because he judged it the best option - not because somebody stuffed it into his hands. However, because he & his foundation are so well-resourced, it fails to communicate anything about the cost-effectiveness of the product.

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      • #93
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        That's why they get a ton of free shit, plus all stuff that gives "benefits" if you are rich enough, like expensive credit cards with air miles and Concierge service.
        Part of it s that those who don't need credit that have the easiest time getting it.

        Those inducements are because the company knows that the rich are likely to make some very large purchases, and it doesn't take too many of those to pay for things like a concierge. So, it's just a value-differential they're using to gain a competitive edge.

        It's a bit unrelated to product promotions and endorsements, though.

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        • #94
          Originally posted by CochainComplex View Post
          16GB RAM is enough for the most workloads ATM.
          More cores -> more jobs -> more RAM.

          A 64-thread machine with just 16 GB of RAM will probably be something of a swapfest, assuming you're ever actually using most of the cores.

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          • #95
            Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
            Things have value. Therefore, receiving something of value is always beneficial. Ergo, it's always a mutually beneficial exchange when someone prominent is gifted an item in exchange for the marketing exposure. Not sure how getting a free expensive thing cannot be construed as beneficial to the recipient?
            I hate to spoil your idealism about some sort of bartering economy, but that's just not how it usually works. Professional athletes don't simply get free products. They're actually paid to use them. Same with the most prominent social media influencers, or so I've heard.

            The value and utility of the product simply isn't enough, on its own, to be worth the recipient's time or not using an option they might even prefer. In exchange for sums of money often quite substantially more than the value of the products, the company gets to control how it's presented and promoted.

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            • #96
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              You can get a Ryzen 3 APU that is more than twice as powerful and has integrated graphics.
              There's no ability to properly utilize ECC RAM on their APUs, unless you get a Ryzen Pro (or embedded) APU, which aren't sold through retail channels.

              For servers, you can get some motherboards that have a BMC, so you might not need either an APU or discrete GPU.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by coder View Post
                FWIW, loading up both slots per channel with dual-rank, double-sided DIMMs is going to hurt your memory clock speeds, which are probably a bottleneck on a CPU like 3950X.

                If someone were going to spend that much on RAM, it'd be worth considering stepping up to the TR platform and also doubling your bandwidth.
                Hah, if it is a bootleneck for a 3950x what about a Ryzen 5 1600X (which is what I have on such a config). Puny human, I have maximum bottleneck.

                To be fair, I'm just recycling my gaming rig hardware with more RAM, and turning the Windows system into a Windows VM with GPU passthrough.

                That said, TB is the likely upgrade in a few years, also because it has much better IOMMU groups for passthrough than AM4 boards, and a ton of PCIe slots.

                The RAM gets migrated over.

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                • #98
                  Originally posted by _Alex_ View Post
                  This is threadripper though. A high end desktop part.
                  But it uses the same CPU dies as EPYC and Ryzen 3000 (and probably the same I/O die as EPYC). I think what they mainly care about is that they're selling all the dies they can get manufactured. A secondary concern is about having a presence in key markets, and that's where ThreadRipper probably plays a distant 3rd to either EPYC or the desktop/laptop parts.

                  I think AMD likes the "halo" effect of having a leading workstation and high-end desktop solution, but I doubt it's a big profit center for them.

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                  • #99
                    Originally posted by ryao View Post
                    I updated my post to link to the $3000 Intel model. AMD’s 64 core model actually costs a little more:

                    https://www.amazon.com/AMD-Ryzen-Thr.../dp/B0815SBQ9W

                    There really is no reason to go with Intel at this price range though. You get double the performance per dollar with AMD.
                    The TR CPU Linus actually used (3970X) has 114% of the Xeon-W 3175X's core count and costs just 61.2% as much, going by current Newegg prices ($1900 vs $3104).

                    So, not just a better value, but also substantially cheaper. What the Intel chip has in its favor is 6-channel memory and up to 512 GB vs. ThreadRipper's 4-channel and only 256 GB. But, the ThreadRipper gives you more PCIe lanes, unless you can use whichever version Apple sourced for the Mac Pro that re-purposed some of the UPI pins to unlock an equivalent 64 lanes. Except the AMD chip has PCIe 4.0, while Intel is still stuck on 3.0. So, PCIe is decidedly in AMD's favor, even if memory isn't.

                    Basically, unless you need 512 GB of RAM or that little bit extra bandwidth (which is more of an issue for the 64-core 3990X), there's basically no case for the Intel option. Maybe AVX-512 (which Zen2 lacks), but even then you're better off trying to use GPU compute for those few workloads that could take advantage of it.

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                    • Originally posted by coder View Post
                      There's no ability to properly utilize ECC RAM on their APUs, unless you get a Ryzen Pro (or embedded) APU, which aren't sold through retail channels.
                      We are talking of used hardware here, Xeons and servers aren't usually available through retail channels either (or at affordable prices for that matter).

                      I have acquired and use a pro Ryzen 5 APU with ECC ram on an Asrock board as my main system for at least a year now.
                      They have been available continuously on Aliexpress for at least a year now
                      See a Ryzen 5 2400G APU Pro https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000358435124.html
                      and a Ryzen 3 2200G APU Pro https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4001066371045.html that is available in high supply from 4-5 different sellers and is great for a basic desktop system where you don't run compile jobs and such.

                      For servers, you can get some motherboards that have a BMC, so you might not need either an APU or discrete GPU.
                      We were talkign of a desktop system, and a BMC on a desktop is bullshit.

                      For home server use I don't need a GPU, as Asrock AM4 boards don't need a GPU to boot (I don't know about other AM4 boards), and I can set OpenSUSE to use the serial console so I can log in through that if network is down. Of course I need a GPU while setting up the system the first time as that's the only way to see BIOS setup, but after that I can just hook up a serial and be fine (OpenSUSE automatically detects that I'm connected on serial when installing and shows the "serial install interface" to do stuff)

                      So... checkmate.

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