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New Qt Releases Might Now Be Restricted To Paying Customers For 12 Months

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  • #31
    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
    I can't help but smile when thinking that some projects abandoned GTK for Qt, like Audacious for example.... It serves you well, we are getting GTK4 soon, which will be awesome and support all the latest and greatest standards like Wayland and Vulkan, and they are going to be stuck with old Qt5 since 6 is going to be paywalled. LOL.
    Audacious is a especially funny case (personal opinion).
    Few user outside Linux use it, and even on Linux I prefer deadbeef, which is quite happy with Gtk3 and its Windows port is also Gtk-based.
    I really can't see its necessity of moving to Qt, as a Linux audio player.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by MadCatX View Post
      Such as say, Vim, GIMP, Inkscape, LibreOffice, TexLive, ffmpeg...?

      When a major player in the FOSS world considers to turn their back the FOSS world, it is obviously a cause for concern.
      I don't think they're legally allowed to do such a thing given the license their code base is under and contributions have been committed with. Qt can do this because of the CLA they have, although restricted to 12 months.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Britoid View Post
        If this was another open source project and not Qt I bet you half the people here defending this decision wouldn't be doing so.
        Neah, this discussion comes up in like every thread. It;s just that some people equate open source with community property, while others (myself included) don't. I don't see the fuss, I think there's room under the Sun for everybody. Yet we cannot escape this debate.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by zxy_thf View Post
          Audacious is a especially funny case (personal opinion).
          Few user outside Linux use it, and even on Linux I prefer deadbeef, which is quite happy with Gtk3 and its Windows port is also Gtk-based.
          I really can't see its necessity of moving to Qt, as a Linux audio player.
          GTKs cross-platform (mainly Windows) support has never been fantastic though.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Termy View Post

            thats what i think, too.
            Sure it will be annoying and possibly slow the transition to wayland, but KDE will continue to be as awesome as it is ^^
            I think the OSS transition will continue to happen as normal. It would definitely slow down the upstream Qt Companies transition to Wayland though. Most work on Qt is contributed. The Qt Company leeches the OSS efforts with their CLA.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by MadCatX View Post
              If this happens, it will be an indirect impact.
              That's semantics, the effect is them getting less money.
              To get Qt SDK and services you pay 5.5k per-developer yearly subscription, for "desktop/mobile" while it's "call us for a quote" for embedded, and you know what "call us for a quote" usually means ($$$$$$).

              That's a significant cost for many smaller companies, and embedded development will hit medium sized ones as well.

              I don't believe that the QtCo has many (if any) contracts where they would take payment in the form of percentage of the customer's revenue.
              They have "distribution license fees" for selling devices using Qt in their interface. PC/mobile apps have no such fees.

              If you have a business built upon Qt, how is dropping QtCo a good idea unless you didn't really need commercial license in the first place?
              If your businness needs to reduce costs or die off, yes it becomes a good idea to either drop some "developers" from the license or renegotiate for a cheaper agreement.

              Also some companies may very well just die off outright (startups are already struggling to find new investors, for example) or stop less important projects and focus on other stuff that is their core businness, at least for a while.

              Can you keep on using what you have under the commercial terms or do you have to start complying with the GPL?
              Most likely the latter, as the development application seems to be usable only with a licensed account.

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              • #37
                I guess KDE folks will just fork QT and backport any meaningful additions in twelve months then.

                Edit: It seems like other companies have objections aswell and are willing to support a fork if it's necessary. https://mail.kde.org/pipermail/kde-c...q2/006101.html
                Last edited by kiffmet; 08 April 2020, 10:25 AM. Reason: Addition of link

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by kiffmet View Post
                  I guess KDE folks will just fork QT and backport any meaningful additions in twelve months then.
                  Seems like the sensible thing to do.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Britoid View Post

                    GTKs cross-platform (mainly Windows) support has never been fantastic though.
                    I agree, and more importantly the pre-compiled Gtk3 is only available through msys2, which is annoying.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post

                      Exactly, it is THEIR PRODUCT, which means it is NOT A COMMUNITY PRODUCT
                      This is not right, its dual licensed with LGPL-3 and commercial license. I'm quite sure that FSF will defend (L)GPL licensing misuses at court ... They have to release source codes also to the public when they are release Qt 6.

                      However, I'm quite sure that Qt is risk what is explodes to face of KDE community and only solutions is fork Qt and continued with forekd version. Or start using Copperspice.

                      If Qt can close or hide source codes of Qt dev kit, it's huge loss open source community.

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