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New Qt Releases Might Now Be Restricted To Paying Customers For 12 Months

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  • #11
    I think if you use Qt then you knew what you were getting into considering that right up front you can understand that they have their own API. You're at their mercy if you do so no big deal that way. You just get what you get.

    Wouldn't be great if it collapsed though unless Qt just gave it away when that happens.
    Last edited by ix900; 08 April 2020, 08:42 AM.

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    • #12
      I'm fine with that, as long as they keep security updates free. Qt is way too often updated, breaking backwards compatibility way too often too. It's also bloated with various unrelated features being added every 2 seconds, like it has a video player, a web browser, a game engine and whatnot. It's supposed to be a GUI toolkit, not an operating system FFS. Some long term stability could help it, even if it's forced. Devs could actually rely on compatibility and feature set.

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      • #13
        At least this news makes some Gnome/Gtk fanboys happy

        It sounds like the Qt company suffers from some mismanagement. If they are that desperate why not ask for help maybe to drive some projects forward?

        Anyway I'm not worried about KDE, worst case we will get a separate branch of a libreQt with all free software changes in it and the upstream changes are delayed by 12 months. Its bad but not the end the world.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by R41N3R View Post
          At least this news makes some Gnome/Gtk fanboys happy

          It sounds like the Qt company suffers from some mismanagement. If they are that desperate why not ask for help maybe to drive some projects forward?

          Anyway I'm not worried about KDE, worst case we will get a separate branch of a libreQt with all free software changes in it and the upstream changes are delayed by 12 months. Its bad but not the end the world.
          thats what i think, too.
          Sure it will be annoying and possibly slow the transition to wayland, but KDE will continue to be as awesome as it is ^^

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          • #15
            I get that the financial situation of The Qt Company hasn't been exactly great. Qt as it was originally conceived made sense because there were concrete products built on top of it. When the only thing you're selling is a toolkit, you need to have market for it. In the world where SaaS has become quite popular and some of their potential customers can use the GPL version I can see that their business doesn't thrive as much as they'd want. But seriously, what do you get by restricting all to releases to paying customers? Businesses that want and need to pay for Qt think in long term. I don't see many of them jumping on the all shiny and new (and probably buggy) Qt 6 any time soon so what exactly is the point of making it accessible to them first? Doing this with the LTS releases was a kick in the nuts to the GPL world but at least it made some kind of sense.

            It kind of does look like some fresh MBA hotshots took over The Qt Company. Perhaps I will finally have the incentive to give Gtk a go now

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              Blaming Coronavirus for this is stupid, don't they realize, that everyone needs money especially in this period ?
              Posting things like that is stupid, don't you realize that they also need money especially in this period when their clients will pay less or drop it outright?

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              • #17
                Originally posted by blae View Post
                It's their product, they can do whatever they want with it, why are you all so entitled brats? KDE will cope with this just fine.
                Of course it's their decision, but how would this work? The public gets the beta/RC versions and once they're deemed stable they just vanish for 12 months?
                Plus, the IT industry is one of the least affected. We can work just as well (better in many cases) from home. Unless a number of Qt Company's clients canceled products, I don't see an impact here.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Tori View Post

                  Such a low level bait.
                  Well, bitter truth cuts deep to the metal, like low level code. LOL.

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                  • #19
                    This isn't that big of a deal tbh, and not likely to make much of a difference.

                    It's basically a tactic of pay for 12 month exclusive preview access, any open-source contributions and bug reports will now have a 12 month delay, this is how we think it is best to reward our paying customers.

                    Meanwhile, the impact on open-source projects is an initial 1 year setback/delay, not great, but not the end of the world, still plenty of shit that can get done in the mean time. Then it's as if nothing really changed, updates begin streaming in again, even if they're "12 months late", how is it different other than knowing businesses are paying for features that you have to wait a little for to get?

                    Let Qt give it a shot and see if it fixes their short-term financial problems, they had talks about such before covid-19, so it's not like monetizing their platform like this is new all of a sudden. Silly reason to justify covid-19 as pushing it though since if that were a valid concern, they'd understand it'd be impacting their customers too. So at best they get some more money and some backlash from open-source communities which quiets down after 12 months, unless Qt wants to continue support of reducing their community to promote competition against their financial interests.

                    In all fairness though, GitLab does similar with their paid plans, open-source gets the feature reduced core, which over time gets the juicy paid features at a later date. Rockstor lets open-source users use the latest builds while leaving stable core releases to paying customers, these models have been working fine for these companies.

                    So if it works for Qt that's fine, can't complain about getting free software and updates, even if it's a 12 month delay(just look at xorg releases, that's not even dealing with such restrictions...). If the development community that contributes to it and praises Qt gets bitter and moves on to something else, fair enough, Qt either apologizes and does something about it or is ambivalent.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by blae View Post
                      It's their product, they can do whatever they want with it, why are you all so entitled brats? KDE will cope with this just fine.
                      Exactly, it is THEIR PRODUCT, which means it is NOT A COMMUNITY PRODUCT

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