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Apache Software Foundation Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

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  • Apache Software Foundation Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

    Phoronix: Apache Software Foundation Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

    Today marks twenty-one years since the Apache Software Foundation was created out of the Apache Group and incorporated as a non-profit organization...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Foundation-21

  • #2
    Congratulations to the Apache Foundation!

    (Just still wonder what's their plan with OpenOffice, they seem to still maintain it, even if it was obsoleted by LibreOffice. They are still shipping version 4.1 (currently 4.1.7), first released (4.1.0) in 2014)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by oibaf View Post
      They are still shipping version 4.1 (currently 4.1.7), first released (4.1.0) in 2014)
      True but even Microsoft Office 2010 is going strong and that is much older.

      I wonder if the ancient Office 2010 still has a larger market share than LibreOffice in 2020?

      I had an issue with LibreOffice on one of my machines where the Gtk3 engine did not render scroll bars. No idea why. My choices were using the Qt or X11 engines (both are pretty yuck). In the end I downloaded the out of tree OpenOffice (using Gtk2 engine) and went with that. So on that machine, I might be one of the very few using OpenOffice haha.
      Last edited by kpedersen; 03-26-2020, 07:32 AM.

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      • #4
        What I want to know, is what's going on with the commons? They seem to stop working on or updating quite a few. Why have so many if they can't maintain all of them?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ix900 View Post
          What I want to know, is what's going on with the commons? They seem to stop working on or updating quite a few. Why have so many if they can't maintain all of them?
          I believe that's because most of the features are available in newer versions of Java, but it's just an emperical feeling

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          • #6
            And yet Oracle, in their wisdom, kicked ASF from JCP (while inviting other, rather obscure parties in). That's going to work wonders for Java in the mid to long term

            Happy birthday ASF, my job would have been way harder without you around.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by andrei_me View Post

              I believe that's because most of the features are available in newer versions of Java, but it's just an emperical feeling
              Maybe. If you look at commons net though on github, there's some newer commits, but the actual release is really old now. It almost seems like they either don't care or its too much to deal with.

              As far as I know at least some of commons net isn't found in Java official.

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              • #8
                Is it just my feeling or has ASF become a bit passé? Looking at their once popular projects:
                • Apache HTTPD: Yeah, still around, but seems most new deployments are going with nginx.
                • Subversion: Everyone switched to git.
                • OpenOffice.org: Everybody should just use LibreOffice, the less said about this abomination the better
                • Various server-side Java projects (tomcat etc.): Yeah, I'm sure big enterprises use this, just like they still use COBOL.
                The one thing which is still wildly successful with no signs of fading into obscurity is the Apache 2.0 license.

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                • #9
                  > I wonder if the ancient Office 2010 still has a larger market share than LibreOffice in 2020?

                  I wonder if McDonald's still has a larger market share than a company of healthy food in 2020?

                  Yes. That only speaks about people choosing, not about what is best for them in the long run.
                  Last edited by Nth_man; 03-27-2020, 07:10 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ix900 View Post

                    Maybe. If you look at commons net though on github, there's some newer commits, but the actual release is really old now. It almost seems like they either don't care or its too much to deal with.

                    As far as I know at least some of commons net isn't found in Java official.
                    Well, the protocols supported in commons net aren't exactly new or frequently updated, so...

                    Originally posted by jabl View Post
                    Is it just my feeling or has ASF become a bit passé? Looking at their once popular projects:
                    • Apache HTTPD: Yeah, still around, but seems most new deployments are going with nginx.
                    • Subversion: Everyone switched to git.
                    • OpenOffice.org: Everybody should just use LibreOffice, the less said about this abomination the better
                    • Various server-side Java projects (tomcat etc.): Yeah, I'm sure big enterprises use this, just like they still use COBOL.
                    The one thing which is still wildly successful with no signs of fading into obscurity is the Apache 2.0 license.
                    Projects come and go. commons-http (now split in smaller parts) is still going strong.

                    Subversion, well, that was "CVS done right" and as Linus once said, "you can't do CVS right". It was a breath of fresh air at its time, but going nowhere by design.

                    OpenOffice only landed in ASF's lap after Oracle killed it, but refused to acknowledge it did.

                    You're also forgetting projects like Kafka, Spark and their kin
                    Last edited by bug77; 03-26-2020, 07:54 PM.

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