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Netflix Talks Up SVT-AV1 Video Encode/Decode Effort

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  • Netflix Talks Up SVT-AV1 Video Encode/Decode Effort

    Phoronix: Netflix Talks Up SVT-AV1 Video Encode/Decode Effort

    Any regular Phoronix reader should already be quite familiar with SVT-AV1 and the other open-source Scalable Video Technology encoders considering how much we have been benchmarking them -- months before even before they were officially announced. Netflix, which has been working on SVT-AV1 in conjunction with Intel, has an interesting write-up for some weekend reading on the state of this open-source AV1 encoder/decoder...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...s-SVT-AV1-2020

  • #2
    Definitely good (ethical) way forward! Where solutions are based on common/shared FOSS technology, and only vendor's specific application code/infrastructure is kept private.

    Even though big player(s) still keep their monopoly, because of already well established product,... They don't create "vendor locking" using patents, but instead they help to grow technologies for well being of everybody on the planet.

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    • #3
      will a 4 core arm processor from a samsung tv thats 3 years old will be able to play this format @4k or full hd?
      its not like i replace my tv every few months to keep up with the ads

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      • #4
        Originally posted by loganj View Post
        will a 4 core arm processor from a samsung tv thats 3 years old will be able to play this format @4k or full hd?
        its not like i replace my tv every few months to keep up with the ads
        That's unlikely. Such processors usually can't handle even 1080p HEVC software decoding. That's why they have hardware decoder blocks in them. If you want to watch 4K AV1 content on your TV then the most easiest way to do it would be buying a cheap TV box with hardware AV1 decoder. Amlogic S905X4 should hit the shelves this year.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by loganj View Post
          will a 4 core arm processor from a samsung tv thats 3 years old will be able to play this format @4k or full hd?
          its not like i replace my tv every few months to keep up with the ads
          Would expect that depending on how strong the CPU is 1080p could be reachable for software decoding but i don't think that TVs have strong CPUs. Hardware decoder will be most likely needed(Not even sure if Netflix would give higher quality content to non Hardware decoder cause of DRM)

          In the next month will come more AV1 supported hardware on the market.

          Here are some dav1d(AV1 decoder) test on a Odroid N2
          Amlogic S922X Processor (12nm)
          Quad-core Cortex-A73(1.8Ghz) and Dual-core Cortex-A53(1.9Ghz)
          https://code.videolan.org/videolan/d.../15#note_52552

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          • #6
            The first AV1-capable TVs are hitting shelves this year. Not all TVs coming out this year will have decoding capability, however.

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            • #7
              Hmm... the patent trolls are out to get VP9 and AV1.

              let’s hope Google can hit back hard with their video patent stack and Android support.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post
                Hmm... the patent trolls are out to get VP9 and AV1.
                While AV1 techniques have undergone review of possible patented technique infringement, A/V codecs have always been a patent minefield (some of the patents have covered broad fundamental functionality that it is hard to avoid getting close to). Since the current list of potentially applicable patents is not public, there is no way to know what the claims being asserted may be, nor what, if anything, will need to change for AV1 to be either non-infringing or freely implementable if the validity and applicability of those patents is sustained.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

                  While AV1 techniques have undergone review of possible patented technique infringement, A/V codecs have always been a patent minefield (some of the patents have covered broad fundamental functionality that it is hard to avoid getting close to). Since the current list of potentially applicable patents is not public, there is no way to know what the claims being asserted may be, nor what, if anything, will need to change for AV1 to be either non-infringing or freely implementable if the validity and applicability of those patents is sustained.
                  Actually they have made the list public https://sisvel.com/licensing-program...atform/patents
                  https://sisvel.com/images/documents/...1_10032020.pdf AV1 list (so far)
                  You can search for the 'Pat.Nr' on google or duckduckgo and will find most of the time a readable version on patent.google
                  This should be the first in the list https://patents.google.com/patent/CA...n?oq=CA2406459

                  TBH as a non lawyer, is it quite interesting to randomly look thru the list. Hope it will be Fun to watch once the Alliance for open media does fight against these claims
                  Last edited by Toggleton; 03-14-2020, 06:44 PM.

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                  • #10
                    How does it compare to rav1e?

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