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Systemd In Ten Years Has Redefined The Linux Landscape

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  • Farmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuxee View Post

    You put quite some effort into breaking your setup. That's quite an achievement.
    You put more effort in typing that post than was spent in messing with a setup. That's quite an achievement. You get a participation trophy.

    :>systemctl enable mariadb.service
    ok
    :>systemctl start mariadb.service
    ok
    :>systemctl enable nfs-server.service
    ok
    :>systemctl start nfs-server.service
    ok
    :>systemctl enable httpd.service
    ok
    :>systemctl start httpd.service
    ok


    reboot. No database or NFS. Httpd running fine.

    :>systemctl enable mariadb.service
    "Your spell still has no effect."
    :>systemctl enable nfs-server.service
    "Your spell still has no effect."
    :>systemctl start mariadb.service
    ok
    :>systemctl start nfs-server.service
    ok
    :>systemctl restart httpd.service
    ok

    * When systemctl enable httpd works
    * But systemctl enable mariadb and systemctl enable nfs-server don't.
    * But they start fine manually.
    * The software is borked. Fanbois opinions not withstanding.

    I'd write a bash script and hit that when the machine starts but I'd have to care more. I'd spend the time to figure out what's wrong but I'd also have to care more. Some of you missed the point. It works more poorly than the predecessors. That I refuse to spend the time and effort tracking it down notwithstanding. Much less effort just to start them on boot manually.

    I do work on my computer. Instead of work on my computer. Whenever possible.



    Leave a comment:


  • ALRBP
    replied
    Originally posted by bachchain View Post

    You must really not like GNU, then.
    Ridiculous.
    GNU software are independent.
    glibc, GCC, Bash… all those things are independent.
    GNU software works great independently, even on *BSD systems, unlike systemd.
    Comparing systemd with GNU is absurd.
    Last edited by ALRBP; 20 December 2019, 01:20 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Veto
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    Really? Here's my generic template.
    It's this easy: ...
    Exactly! I never managed to get around to write one of these fragile ~50 lines shell scripts needed for the old init system, so I just had to make do with some small hackish scripts called from rc.local. But I recently tried making one of these ~10 lines systemd service files with success. It is really not hard!

    ... And rc.local still seems to work for the odd hack.

    Leave a comment:


  • bachchain
    replied
    Originally posted by ALRBP View Post
    That said, the thing I really do not like with systemd is the idea to put in one big software things that should be independent.
    You must really not like GNU, then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    I liked service status more than systemctl status, service scripts have less boilerplate now, the new security bugs should have been avoided with rust. otherwise systemd is not changed anything for me.
    You're completely reliant on a shell script to implement the status functionality, so I don't know how you could prefer it given they're all different.

    Leave a comment:


  • pkese
    replied
    Thanks to whomever posted the link to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_AIw9bGogo
    It is a great and unbiased (FreeBSD perspective) look at systemd.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuxee
    replied
    Originally posted by Farmer View Post
    30 years ago I was able to stick stuff in autoexec.bat and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    20 years ago I moved to Linux and figured out the init system. Put stuff in there and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    Today after my computer starts I get to manually start the database server and NFS. Then restart the web server.

    No, systemd hasn't made my life better. The old init system worked, systemd doesn't.

    You put quite some effort into breaking your setup. That's quite an achievement.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by Farmer View Post
    30 years ago I was able to stick stuff in autoexec.bat and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    20 years ago I moved to Linux and figured out the init system. Put stuff in there and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    Today after my computer starts I get to manually start the database server and NFS. Then restart the web server.

    No, systemd hasn't made my life better. The old init system worked, systemd doesn't.

    Really? Here's my generic template.

    It's this easy:

    Code:
    [Unit]
    Description=A description
    
    [Service]
    Type=oneshot
    ExecStart=/path/to/something
    RemainAfterExit=yes
    
    [Install]
    WantedBy=multi-user.target
    1. name that "foobar.service"
    2. copy "foobar.service" to "/etc/systemd/system/foobar.service"
    3. give it 644 permissions
    4. treat it like any other systemd service; "sudo systemctl start foobar.service" to run once; "sudo systemctl enable foobar.service" to start on boot; etc)
    Use Goolge or your search engine of choice to look up more advanced information, but that template works just fine to load up simple scripts on boot. Here's an actual one of mine for a working example (w/o the script it uses because you can generate your own with WattmanGTK).

    Code:
    [Unit]
    Description=Apply WattmanGTK settings
    
    [Service]
    Type=oneshot
    ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/Set_WattmanGTK_Settings.sh
    RemainAfterExit=yes
    
    [Install]
    WantedBy=multi-user.target

    Leave a comment:


  • Britoid
    replied
    Originally posted by Farmer View Post
    30 years ago I was able to stick stuff in autoexec.bat and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    20 years ago I moved to Linux and figured out the init system. Put stuff in there and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    Today after my computer starts I get to manually start the database server and NFS. Then restart the web server.

    No, systemd hasn't made my life better. The old init system worked, systemd doesn't.

    I know this might be difficult but.

    Have you tried reading the manual?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bigon
    replied
    Originally posted by Farmer View Post
    30 years ago I was able to stick stuff in autoexec.bat and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    20 years ago I moved to Linux and figured out the init system. Put stuff in there and it started automatically when the computer booted.
    Today after my computer starts I get to manually start the database server and NFS. Then restart the web server.

    No, systemd hasn't made my life better. The old init system worked, systemd doesn't.

    Well if you have that kind of problem it means your system is not well configured, I've no problems with webserver, DB or NFS on mines

    Leave a comment:

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