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Systemd In Ten Years Has Redefined The Linux Landscape

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  • Systemd In Ten Years Has Redefined The Linux Landscape

    Phoronix: Systemd In Ten Years Has Redefined The Linux Landscape

    Systemd got its start in 2010 in providing a better init system and expanded its scope from there. As part of our year-end and end-of-2010s articles, here is a look at the top systemd stories from the past distribution controversies to new features and other highlights...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...=systemd-2010s

  • #2
    This should be a calm and non-controversial topic.
    Let's all post only our thoughts on the technical merits of systemd and how it has improved our lives.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by NateHubbard View Post
      This should be a calm and non-controversial topic.
      Let's all post only our thoughts on the technical merits of systemd and how it has improved our lives.
      that would be ideal, but you know what trolls are like

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      • #4
        As a desktop user...

        The only systemd good thing is about using INI files.

        Other than that, I just see stuff mostly targeted at servers.

        Are there other stuff? Other than cannibalize projects and maintain them properly? On a purely feature basis, I understand standardization is good for developers and sysadmins.

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        • #5
          Nice idea. Awful implementation. Megalomaniac developer.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NateHubbard View Post
            ...and how it has improved our lives.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by timofonic View Post
              As a desktop user...

              The only systemd good thing is about using INI files.

              Other than that, I just see stuff mostly targeted at servers.

              Are there other stuff? Other than cannibalize projects and maintain them properly? On a purely feature basis, I understand standardization is good for developers and sysadmins.
              Only for servers, only for embedded, only for running containers, only replacing a dozen of tools (socket activation ala inetd, sv, ) with parsable config files and making the functionality inter-operable (without duct-tape and hacks), only standardizing a whole set of system configuration (which often did exist before), only simplifying stuff like read-only root, only preparing for stuff like a finally fully isolated home.

              Yeah, desktop doesnt need it, users can always restart stuff manually. I had so much fun researching what packages are actually responsible for weird effects, and how to fix them in the good old times.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by discordian View Post
                Yeah, desktop doesnt need it, users can always restart stuff manually. I had so much fun researching what packages are actually responsible for weird effects, and how to fix them in the good old times.
                The sky didn't crumble when I started using OpenRC.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by discordian View Post
                  Yeah, desktop doesnt need it, users can always restart stuff manually. I had so much fun researching what packages are actually responsible for weird effects, and how to fix them in the good old times.
                  Dude, daemontools has been around since.. 2001? Plus it had multiple forks/improvements/iterations. FreeBSD ports has 4 different service management tools that I know of, upstreams of all available/workable on Linux as well I assume..

                  You never thought to look around for third party service manager? "Manual restarting" is getting rather worn down as arguments go ^^

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                  • #10
                    I liked service status more than systemctl status, service scripts have less boilerplate now, the new security bugs should have been avoided with rust. otherwise systemd is not changed anything for me.

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