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USB 4.0 "USB4" Specification Published

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  • tuxd3v
    replied
    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
    So it is NOT backwards compatible with USB 1.0/1.1? That's a pretty glaring omission. There are tons of older HID devices, printers, label printers, and other devices that don't need much bandwidth and typically have a long service life. People gonna be pissed when they find this out the hard way.
    Well, what you say is true..
    But it could be that new machines will have 1 or 2 USB 2.0 ports( so that you could use USB1.1 if you want too ), and some USB4.X,
    In this way you have USB covered from USB1.0 til USB4..
    USB2.0 is backwards compatible with 1.0..
    USB4 is backwards compatible til 2.0..

    What this mean,
    Is that Computers will forget USB3.x, and ship with USB2.0 and USB4 ports..

    Leave a comment:


  • andreano
    replied
    Originally posted by AsuMagic View Post
    Soon to be renamed Ultraspeed USB 4.2.0 Gen 2.2x4 40Gbps?
    … consistent with continuing the retroactive renaming of USB3
    * USB 3.1 Gen 2 → USB 4.1 Gen 2
    * USB 3.1 Gen 1 → USB 4.1 Gen 1

    Leave a comment:


  • torsionbar28
    replied
    Originally posted by tuxd3v View Post
    What we see in a cheap way, is sending a pair of PCIe( x1 ), via USB 3.1 cables, but I believe no USB protocol is involved, only the communication Line is used( conector/Cable ), the protocol is PCIe..
    It is not uncommon for different technologies to share existing layer 1 cabling and connectors. It makes sense. Why re-invent when an existing cable and connector meets your specs?
    • Ethernet, Token Ring, T1, and others use CAT5 cable and RJ45 connector.
    • CGA/EGA video, Token Ring, and RS232 serial all used DB9 connector.
    • Various RF, Audio, Video, and early Ethernet applications use coax cable and BNC connectors.
    • FibreChannel, Ethernet, Infiniband, and Myrinet all use 1.25mm optical cabling with LC connector.
    These are just a few examples. But yes I agree that consumers are non technical and easily confused, and some additional differentiator like a keyed connector or color coding would be helpful to avoid confusion and potential equipment damage.

    Leave a comment:


  • edwaleni
    replied
    Basically, it is bundle everything into a single cable to get data from point A to point B and let the endpoints decide what to do with it. Bus it, Switch it, multiplex it, tunnel it, device it, display it. The silicon at each end simply negotiates the capability of the cable and then the switch determines its logical path.

    Leave a comment:


  • tuxd3v
    replied
    Originally posted by ThoreauHD View Post
    So.. what's changed between this and usb 3.2 protocol? This shit's really confusing. Asrock X570's have thunderbolt 3/usb 3.2 already. What's the 4 do?
    USB 3.2 in a nutshell, gives you 2 new SuperSpeed+ modes( IF data are passed trough USB-C conector.. ).
    • 10Gb/s
    • 20Gb/s
    USB 4.0 in a nutshell, gives you 40 Gb/s( doubles the bandwidth.. ), If trough USB-C connector/cable..
    Its also compatible with Thunderbolt 3 and older revisions of USB til USB2.0..

    if you already have Thunderbolt3( compatible with usb3.1, I believe ?!),
    You already have 40 Gb/s..

    Leave a comment:


  • torsionbar28
    replied
    Originally posted by pegasus View Post
    On the other side ... in 2010 you only had 40Gb in HPC cluster, in 2020 you'll have it on your desktop.
    So it takes about a decade for tech to be ready for everyday consumer.
    This is accurate. When I was building DEC Alpha supercomputers at DEC/Compaq in the late 1990's, those machines all had Gigabit Ethernet cards. They were large cards with a big heatsink on them. It was another decade before Gig-E would be a mass market consumer technology.

    With NIC cards, power consumption and heat output are major factors. You can put a big heatsink in a server with screaming fans to cool it. Not so much in a consumer pc, or even worse, a laptop. Semiconductor lithography is a big part of this. As CPU's and GPU's move to smaller process node, older fabs are freed up to make things like NIC card chips. So yes it does take many years before the newest technologies can be economically shrunk down to operate cool enough for installation in consumer equipment.

    Leave a comment:


  • tuxd3v
    replied
    Originally posted by brent View Post
    So does this support PCIe or not? I think this was one major feature where it still wasn't clear which direction USB would take. I of course hope it does retain PCIe support from Thunderbolt! Everything else sounds great - especially the flexible bandwidth allocation.
    USB 3.1 at least is very close, even in frequencies used,
    You can see it by the PCIe raisers they use a USB 3.1 connector/cable, of 1 meter max( due to wave length, line impedance, etc).

    What we see in a cheap way, is sending a pair of PCIe( x1 ), via USB 3.1 cables, but I believe no USB protocol is involved, only the communication Line is used( conector/Cable ), the protocol is PCIe..

    I believe what you want is some PCIe 'pass-trough' USB, or PCIe encapsulated in USB packets?

    Leave a comment:


  • anth
    replied
    The spec can be downloaded from https://www.usb.org/document-library...-specification

    Leave a comment:


  • davidbepo
    replied
    Originally posted by AndyChow View Post

    I second this. I don't want random hardware that has direct access to PCIe lanes. I'm pretty sure they showed external thunderbolt "harddrives" can take over your computer, aka "Thunderclap".

    I can also imagine a USB Killer type device that now fries your CPU directly.
    welp, i guess thats a good reason

    Leave a comment:


  • ThoreauHD
    replied
    So.. what's changed between this and usb 3.2 protocol? This shit's really confusing. Asrock X570's have thunderbolt 3/usb 3.2 already. What's the 4 do?

    Leave a comment:

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