Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sam Hartman Is Debian's Newest Project Leader, Aims To "Keep Debian Fun"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    Originally posted by carrionbear View Post

    this, what sam was saying directly targeted people like u eggbert. no one wants to deal with this shitshow of a community cause half of yall manchildren screech "its da sjw's!!11!!" ... get outta here lol
    You are proving their point, though.

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

      Dependencies are for making software to work. Arch Linux breaks easily and you must update all packages and often. Debian you can update when you want and what you want. Rolling back is easy with ppa-purge, it is easy switch between Padoka ppa, Oibaf ppa and distribution Mesa. You can run Debian testing/sid years without reinstalling OS. Debian testing has rolled since year 2000.
      I switched to Arch because of frustrations with Debian and Debian based distros.

      I have Consul, Node, JDK 8-12, RabbitMQ, MariaDB, Postgres, Cassandra, Ruby, KDE, Cinnamon, ElasticSearch, Virtualbox, Docker, Apache, PHP, and a whole assortment of Python2 and 3, stuff with all sorts of dependencies. In 5 years the only thing that broke was RabbitMQ and Erlang. Just used the downgrader and downgraded Erlang and blocked Erlang from future updates until RabbitMQ caught up.

      I started toying with Alpine and I think that would also make a pretty good desktop, but you have to check the package repo if software you may need works with it, I have gotten the JDK (Needs glibc) to work by modifying AdoptOpenJDK docker compose file to a shell script.

      I just wish SELinux was easier to use, and Arch supported it/easier to install I would have no problem using it as a public facing server (Well with a staging environment)

      Comment


      • #23
        Originally posted by kravemir View Post
        It's not about pleasing everyone.

        It's about keeping discussions constructive, and also keeping discussions on content level, not going in emotional personal fights or flames.
        You have a fair point, but trying to sustain constructive criticism is difficult when you've got a lot of volunteers and relatively anonymous communication between maintainers/developers (people are much more aggressive behind a screen and keyboard). Keep in mind that open-source projects are heavily influenced by people's principles (whereas closed-source projects tend to be more influenced by money). So, once you start doing stuff that meddles with people's principles, that's when you get heated disagreements. Debian is a really big project, so it's not difficult for people to get angry and expressive over their anger, hence my point of "keeping Debian fun" to be an impossible goal.

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
          (whereas closed-source projects tend to be more influenced by money)
          At a management level, sure, but developers rarely argue about money. There are lots of heated arguments even in closed source software development, although they're often face-to-face and therefore more restrained. I have seen developers explode in the middle of the office though. Developers are just highly opinionated people and struggle to differentiate between what is objectively better and what is personal preference.

          Comment


          • #25
            Originally posted by randomizer View Post
            At a management level, sure, but developers rarely argue about money. There are lots of heated arguments even in closed source software development, although they're often face-to-face and therefore more restrained. I have seen developers explode in the middle of the office though. Developers are just highly opinionated people and struggle to differentiate between what is objectively better and what is personal preference.
            For the most part I totally agree, but the difference is in that context, you're paid to fulfill the request given to you; it's your job. You might not like what you have to do and you might even know a better approach, but unless you're asked for something physically impossible, it is your obligation to do as you're requested. In an ideal work environment, everyone will take the time to listen to each other and come to an agreed-upon solution, but ultimately you have to do whatever it is the customer wants and what your superiors want, or else you don't get paid (or don't have a job).
            Luckily for me, I do get a voice in the company I work for. Not everything goes my way, but I don't tend to complain because if I'm told to do something that's more complex, time-wasting, or counter-intuitive, the blame isn't put on me, so long as I do my work correctly and within a reasonable time frame. Besides, sometimes my ideas are wrong or bad, in which case it is good they weren't done; that goes hand-in-hand with what you said about "objectively better vs personal preference".
            Last edited by schmidtbag; 04-22-2019, 12:03 AM.

            Comment


            • #26
              I use Debian because the Social Contract, because it is not just about technology but mainly about community and free-software.

              Comment


              • #27
                And here comes the divisiveness...with abbreviations like "SJW" which has very deep roots in right-wing propaganda used to divide groups of people. I don't like the Debian stuff either, but lets not bring the mainstream propaganda, politics and hate into the community eh...

                Humans are individuals, they all have different opinions. Get use to it and move on.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
                  right-wing propaganda used to divide groups of people..
                  To be fair, using the term "right" wing or "left" wing is making a divide much larger than the (often mutual) term of SJW which is generally used these days simply as a label for opinionated time wasters.

                  That said, I complete agree with you; this propaganda, politics and hate (sometimes masquerading as "different opinions") has no place in any productive and friendly community. Relevant opinions are great; so is constructive criticism; however hate is just pointless :/

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

                    Phoronix, do something for dungeon and other insulting users.
                    Well if that's not the pot calling the kettle black. You're one of the biggest offenders here in these forums in that regard. If one looks up "troll" or "reasons for a blocklist" in the dictionary, there'll be a huge picture of you next to it.

                    But I will second your request. Please Michael, get the blocklists working, so we can block the inane drivel from this user.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      ....aaaand Debian keeps chugging into the void of political correctness. good riddance to the day they disappear.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X