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The Fastest Linux Distributions For Web Browsing - Firefox + Chrome Benchmarks On Eight Distros

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  • The Fastest Linux Distributions For Web Browsing - Firefox + Chrome Benchmarks On Eight Distros

    Phoronix: The Fastest Linux Distributions For Web Browsing - Firefox + Chrome Benchmarks On Eight Distros

    With now having WebDriver/Seleneium integration in PTS for carrying out browser benchmarks, we've been having fun running a variety of web browser benchmarks in different configurations. The latest is looking at the Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome web browser performance across eight Linux distribution releases (or nine if counting Fedora Workstation on both X.Org and Wayland) for looking at how the web browsing performance compares.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=27710

  • #2
    Typos:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Majaro Linux 18.0.4,

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    • #3
      I wonder why openSUSE's defaults are so conservative in comparison to the other distros.

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      • #4
        The browsers come with countless settings and options. It would be good to know where the distros differ in these settings. I am using Debian Buster with Chrome, which here didn't do too bad, but I found many hardware rendering features of Chrome to be disabled by default (see the URLs chrome://gpu and chrome://flags).

        I had to enable some of the hardware acceleration manually with the command line options --enable-native-gpu-memory-buffers, --enable-zero-copy and --ignore-gpu-blacklist.

        I don't think this test was very representative unless somebody happens to have the exact same hardware as in this test.
        Last edited by sdack; 03-29-2019, 12:55 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sdack View Post
          I had to enable some of the hardware acceleration manually with the command line options --enable-native-gpu-memory-buffers, --enable-zero-copy and --ignore-gpu-blacklist.
          I had to do the same too. No problems so far after enabling them, despite their bug claims.

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          • #6
            Is it aggressive security mitigations that are penalizing Tumbleweed? Would be nice to know.

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            • #7
              Is anyone working on adding VAAPI support to Firefox? WebRTC is abysmal without hardware acceleration for encoding / decoding, especially on laptops.

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              • #8
                Clear Linux is very much a work in progress, and although the goal is general usage, it definitely isn't there yet, and nowhere near production. Experienced devs can use it as a daily driver, but a lot is still missing and buggy. They also plan to rely on Flatpaks for most application-level packages if available, and not native builds. The devs are great and respond to most issues within a day or two.

                No doubt Michael's coverage is getting Clear some good publicity. But it is amusing to see brogrammers go on Clear's github and ask "Can It Haz Steam and AUR?" The perils of popularity! Part of me is hoping Intel keeps Clear obtuse enough to exclude that crowd. lol

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Apparition B5 View Post
                  I wonder why openSUSE's defaults are so conservative in comparison to the other distros.
                  It should not be benchmarked for performance. Default configuration includes btrfs instead of much faster EXT4, balloo running constantly on KDE and interfering with performance as it does an initial index of the entire system, and a CPU governor on top of it.

                  Why are these the defaults? openSUSE is the testing ground for SUSE enterprise linux, for which btrfs is an important technology, and which has a goal of stability despite a wide range of technologies. I'm assuming that's the reason why.

                  Anyone who wanted performance would not run it this way. They would install it on EXT4, turn off balloo indexing, and switch the CPU governor to "performance" mode. Among other things. Personally, I would run Mate for a better performance instead of KDE. Also, I get better performance when I compile my own kernels.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by shmerl View Post
                    Is anyone working on adding VAAPI support to Firefox? WebRTC is abysmal without hardware acceleration for encoding / decoding, especially on laptops.
                    As far as I know, no one is working on it. In recent years, Mozilla treats Linux users as third-class people.

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