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Facebook Continues Making Extensive Use Of systemd

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  • #11
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post

    rm -R $YourBullshit
    ROFL.. careful, i was drinking coffee when i read that

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Candy View Post
      for i in "keylogger" "spyware" "usersniffer" "hiddenprivatedatauploader" "gnome3" "flatpakspywareinstaller" "pulseaudiostutterfeature" ; do
      systemd enable"${i}.service"
      systemd start "${i}.service"
      done
      You can do it in one step with systemctl enable --now "${i}.service".
      Or even
      systemctl enable --now keylogger spyware usersniffer hiddenprivatedatauploader gnome3 flatpakspywareinstaller pulseaudiostutterfeature

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      • #13
        Originally posted by zdzichu View Post

        That's interesting misconception.
        Now that is being polite

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        • #14
          I ended up watching the whole video. Zero-downtime restarting of services is really neat! Now I have to go look into sd_notify.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by zdzichu View Post
            That's interesting misconception.
            https://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Sof...ystemd/logind/

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            • #16
              This is managing the user session not the login these are different things.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Bigon View Post
                This is managing the user session not the login these are different things.
                Well, you can twist the semantics however you like, but for all intents and purposes (and definitely for the non-technical user), the session is the login.

                The language that systemd's own documentation uses, implies the same thing:
                logind(8) tracks user log-ins and keeps track of which processes are used, by use of a pam_systemd PAM module, so that processes can be cleaned up when a user logs out, or the user is forced to log out, such as when the administrator needs to perform maintainance, or the user is no longer permitted to use the server.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Bigon View Post

                  This is managing the user session not the login these are different things.
                  It's called "logind" man, not "sessiond". There is a reason.

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                  • #19
                    Wow, this discussion had 'systemd' in it and there wasn't nearly the level of flames I expected. Quick, Poettering, write something new that the tech internet can explode over for the next ten years!

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post

                      rm -R $YourBullshit
                      You should quote that variable. He may have used spaces. That command could thus go horribly wrong.

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