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Google Still Doesn't Trust Linux GPU Drivers Enough To Enable Chrome Video Acceleration

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  • #31
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Video HW acceleration works just fine on AMD/Intel? Using which API? Using which version of this API?

    There's no need to be retarded when you can just accept that video HW acceleration in Linux is a fucking mess.
    Both Intel and AMD work fine with libva (va-api) - exactly the same API they use on ChromeOS. Intel engineers went as far as supporting seamless transition between overlaid and composited video (which is important for mobile devices, nice for laptops and not interesting for desktops).

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    • #32
      Originally posted by birdie View Post

      Video HW acceleration works just fine on AMD/Intel? Using which API? Using which version of this API?

      There's no need to be retarded when you can just accept that video HW acceleration in Linux is a fucking mess.
      Actually there are few bugs in the libva driver here and there but it works perfectly. Using chromium with vaapi acceleration for 6 months now.(Actually became a maintainer on fedora's rpmfusion and official package is coming in this week).

      According to my testing on amdgpu and intel, Only dash videos with different video profiles breaks sometimes. Rest is stable with absolute no crashes. (Unless you're using Nvidia which is understandable.)
      Intel vaapi driver breaks on wayland.
      My opinion,
      Unless someone build something like this which enable user to test and report bugs, how can someone fix the existing bugs and improve the existing libva driver?

      Also look at Nvidia.! First they decided to choose vdpau, and they left it to rot in the dust(No hevc 10 bit support) and now introduced their proprietary codec, 'nvdec'.

      Linux needs a standard video acceleration api.

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      • #33
        Don't waste yours precious time on birdie

        https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...karounds/page9

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        • #34
          Originally posted by birdie View Post

          "Linux on the desktop is essentially broken but I feel good about myself because I use it with a dozen of hacks to make the Linux experience bearable" - every Linux user.
          You're mistaken. If you buy a GNU/Linux system from a vendor (Dell, System76 etc), then it will work beautifully, out-of-the-box. All hardware will function. No hacks necessary.

          The above is the fair way to compare GNU/Linux to Windows and Mac. Windows and Mac users will typically buy a pre-made system and thus everything will just work.

          What you're probably thinking of is GNU/Linux users that choose to build their own system or get GNU/Linux working on hardware X. Sure they will have some issues: they're effectively creating their own DIY product. This is a pro of GNU/Linux not a con. Technical users are empowered to get things working. They are often successful and enjoy the process.

          If you're not a technical user or you just don't want the hassle, just buy a GNU/Linux system. I did that for one of my GNU/Linux systems and it has been a wonderful experience. I've had this system for something like 4 years now and it has never failed me. Well: it did have a sound issue at one point, but 1. it was fixed for me in an update. 2. My current Windows system has sound issues, so GNU/Linux doesn't compare badly here.

          My 1 Windows system I have I use purely for gaming. It's horrible. I don't think it respects my privacy. Updating software is a pain in the ass: every program does it differently. Windows Update broke a while back and I had to manually download a patch from the Microsoft site to fix it. I expect tons of users didn't do that and they are just now stuck with a system that doesn't update. It runs games better than GNU/Linux: that's the only reason I use it.

          TL;DR: if you fairly compare Windows and GNU/Linux, GNU/Linux compares very favourably.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by birdie View Post

            "I'm a privacy obsessed idiot who wants to look all smart and cool that's why I will say something completely irrelevant because I can".
            Privacy is a relevant topic.
            Valuing your privacy is thus relevant.
            Your argument is thus invalid. Quod Erat Demonstrandum.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by birdie View Post

              Video HW acceleration works just fine on AMD/Intel? Using which API? Using which version of this API?

              There's no need to be retarded when you can just accept that video HW acceleration in Linux is a fucking mess.
              I can't accept things that are just not true.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by birdie View Post
                "a birdie post on Phoronix is essentially trolling but I feel good about myself because I troll him with a dozen of posts to make the Phoronix experience bearable" - every Phoronix user.
                fixed.

                Also please stop posting links to that bullshit site.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by cybertraveler View Post
                  My 1 Windows system I have I use purely for gaming. It's horrible. I don't think it respects my privacy. Updating software is a pain in the ass: every program does it differently. Windows Update broke a while back and I had to manually download a patch from the Microsoft site to fix it. I expect tons of users didn't do that and they are just now stuck with a system that doesn't update. It runs games better than GNU/Linux: that's the only reason I use it.
                  Installing/updating software on desktop linux (apt, dnf etc) was horrible until Flatpak/Snap came along or you used AppImage.

                  I can't install X program because it requires a version of Y that installing said version will break Z which turns out to be important for the system.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Britoid View Post
                    Installing/updating software on desktop linux (apt, dnf etc) was horrible until Flatpak/Snap came along or you used AppImage.

                    I can't install X program because it requires a version of Y that installing said version will break Z which turns out to be important for the system.
                    Installing software on linux is fine as long as you install from your distro repositories.

                    The issue is that you don't find everything in the repos, especially if the distro is shit.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Britoid View Post

                      Installing/updating software on desktop linux (apt, dnf etc) was horrible until Flatpak/Snap came along or you used AppImage.

                      I can't install X program because it requires a version of Y that installing said version will break Z which turns out to be important for the system.
                      It was only horrible/difficult if the user did the DIY thing and started trying to install stuff from outside of the distro-provided repos. This is equivalent to users getting GNU/Linux working on random hardware instead of buying proper known-working hardware. It's a techy/geeky thing.

                      GNU/Linux has historically been a lot like Android with the Play Store and iOS with the App Store. Users have a really simple and easy installation process: they just select what they want to install and it installs and often periodically receives security updates. This is a lot more simple for users than the Windows approach.

                      GNU/Linux in more recent times has received a focus on providing the Windows experience of being able to install stuff from third parties outside of the repo. For that the best option has been Appimage (which has worked very well whenever I've used it) and more recently Flatpak & Snap.

                      I have been using and advocating GNU/Linux for many years and I have never advised a typical user to manually install something from a tar file or similar. If they wanted something outside of the distro repos I would suggest:
                      • Appimage
                      • Snap
                      • Flatpak
                      • Install from Steam
                      • If the third party software vendor provides a repo that you can plug into your distros package management system, use that.
                      All 5 are easy (similar difficulty to installing software on Windows).

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