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SkySilk Launches As Linux-Powered Cloud Provider, Offers AMD EPYC Instances

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  • SkySilk Launches As Linux-Powered Cloud Provider, Offers AMD EPYC Instances

    Phoronix: SkySilk Launches As Linux-Powered Cloud Provider, Offers AMD EPYC Instances

    There is a new public cloud provider that exited beta this past weekend and is exclusively offering Linux instances from Arch Linux to CentOS to Debian and Fedora. In addition to the usual assortment of Intel Xeon powered clouds/VPS instances, they also offer a range of AMD EPYC powered systems too.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=26827

  • #2
    I can rent a physical server for a lot less than that in Germany (EPYC 24 cores, 2x1.92TiB SSD, though not NVMe, 128 GiB RAM for less than €200 for example) - only caveat being that I have to pay for the full month. The larger cloud providers offer a lot of other things like VPC, Block Storage etc. however if you have very inelastic workloads / software (large databases for example) it's probably not cost-effective.
    Last edited by nils_; 09-07-2018, 08:26 AM.

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    • #3
      LXC?
      That means a single kernel for many userspaces, and scales much better for low utilisation.
      Next step up, provide native docker instances :-P

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      • #4
        Originally posted by nils_ View Post
        I can rent a physical server for a lot less than that in Germany (EPYC 24 cores, 2x1.92TiB SSD, though not NVMe, 128 GiB RAM for less than €200 for example) - only caveat being that I have to pay for the full month. The larger cloud providers offer a lot of other things like VPC, Block Storage etc. however if you have very inelastic workloads / software (large databases for example) it's probably not cost-effective.
        Who are your favorite providers?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by cybertraveler View Post

          Who are your favorite providers?
          I'm mostly using Hetzner for my own stuff (mailserver, backup, web server etc.). It's okay if you don't need fast / private networking.

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          • #6
            The thing that rules providers like this (and Linode, and ec2) out is storage. yeah, it's great you can get a couple hundred gigs of fast storage, but if you don't provide an option to get a terabyte or two of slower storage you're not going to be a great choice for a big number of workloads. For pure compute it's great, but as a web hosting provider I typically run out of disk space well before anything else.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nils_ View Post

              I'm mostly using Hetzner for my own stuff (mailserver, backup, web server etc.). It's okay if you don't need fast / private networking.
              Also OpenWrt build servers are from Hetzner.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by squash View Post
                The thing that rules providers like this (and Linode, and ec2) out is storage. yeah, it's great you can get a couple hundred gigs of fast storage, but if you don't provide an option to get a terabyte or two of slower storage you're not going to be a great choice for a big number of workloads. For pure compute it's great, but as a web hosting provider I typically run out of disk space well before anything else.
                Amazon can give you spinning rust storage as well: $0.045/GiB for normal spinning rust, $0.025 / GiB for "cold storage", presumably SMR HDD.

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                • #9
                  0.045/gb is $45 per 1tb of storage, plus their nickel and dime game on actually utilizing it, not to mention their nickel and dime game on transferring that data outside of AWS.

                  kimsufi will sell you a complete physical server with 2tb of spinning rust and unlimited data transfer for under $20/month, no nickel and dime nonsense. At that price you get to worry about your own redundancy but AWS snapshot storage prices aren't any less wonky than their spinning rust volume prices. Cepf/GlusterFS options look better and better as those costs diverge.

                  AWS makes sense if you are dependant on specific features. Startups who don't have expertise in infrastructure. Workloads that truly do peak at tens or hundreds of multiples above baseline. Short running tasks.

                  AWS can't compete on price for compute against someone like Linude or this new offering, and neither of them can compete with someone like Kimsufi for bulk storage.

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                  • #10
                    Interesting thanks Michael for heads up. Though pricing wise seems Packet.net AMD EPYC 7401 bare metal hourly is cheaper at 48 cpu threads mark

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