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DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs

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  • DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs

    Phoronix: DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has provided an update on the open-source operating system project's infrastructure and acknowledging the SSD upgrades that are noticeably beneficial over SSDs...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...BSD-Loves-SSDs

  • #2
    SATA 3.0 SSD's when benchmarking are clearly slower than a NVMe m.2 drive. There are only a few cases when I can really tell a difference in the speed in home use where m.2 vs serial ata makes a noticable difference. The line blurs with everyday use and I am talking a 960 evo vs an intel 530 series. Modern ram is still pretty slow even the highest clocked DDR4, has something to do with bus bandwidth was reading an article somewhere. I could be wrong, have been wrong before. But no I believe its the current ram technology that everyone has AMD and Intel. Even though ddr4 3200 transfers at 25.6 GB per second, there is some type of bottleneck in the chain.
    Last edited by creative; 07-13-2018, 10:40 PM.

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    • #3
      It's not so bad for Linux but for Windows desktop use, it's a night and day difference.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by computerquip View Post
        It's not so bad for Linux but for Windows desktop use, it's a night and day difference.
        x2, a Linux desktop is snappy on a fast HDD. Windows, not so much. I still use HDD's in my workstation, only because I have a RAID 10 of 4x 2TB drives and replacing with SSD is cost prohibitive right now. But probably in the next few years as prices come down I will switch to SSD.

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        • #5
          Don't mean to be nasty to a major free software developer, but what year does this person live in?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by vladpetric View Post
            Don't mean to be nasty to a major free software developer, but what year does this person live in?
            They used (smaller) SSDs since at least 5 years ago, his praise is mostly because prices went down significantly, and now he can afford 2TB SSDs for a few build machines and servers so they could upgrade their infrastructure.

            He means that for any serious project there isn't much reason to use HDD at all given the prices they have now, and that HDDs are now confined to cold data storage and backup.

            The ones still living in 2007 are the OEMs that still place shitty 5400rpm HDDs in laptops instead of some kind of cheap Sata SSD.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by vladpetric View Post
              Don't mean to be nasty to a major free software developer, but what year does this person live in?
              What do you mean?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by vladpetric View Post
                Don't mean to be nasty to a major free software developer, but what year does this person live in?
                Not everyone has rushed to get the new toys. Of the 6 drives in active use in my family house, only 2 are SSDs, and none are in my own desktop.

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                • #9
                  SSDs aren't going to become much cheaper per GB unless they find something cheaper than the typical NAND. We're approaching (or already hit) the limits of shrinking the cells (especially for SSDs due to non-volatile storage, quantum leaks are very bad).

                  Most people don't realize it, but shrinking is special. It reduces cost (more fits in same area) and it boosts the space quadratically, because it's two dimensional.

                  Layering isn't the same thing. Placing more layers on top to increase capacity is a linear increase (just one extra dimension, from 2D to 3D, compared to shrinking two dimensions before at the same time). Furthermore, it's more work to manufacture each layer. So while the capacity might go up, it doesn't mean prices per GB go down with simple layering.


                  ...a good moment to reduce the bloat I reckon instead of expecting much higher/cheaper capacities.

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                  • #10
                    Been running ssd only for a while now. You can pick up a 250GB serial ata ssd for about sixty bucks. Have close to 700GB total on station. It's good to diversify drives or at least thats the way I like it, will eventually add a 4th drive on station for Ghost BSD, Void Linux or the next Slackware release.

                    I want to say the biggest advantage sdd has over platter drives is a great reduction in ambient temperatures especially if those ssd's are sata drives, NVMe even though it runs hot still produces far less heat leakage than a platter drive, also due to the design nature if your mission critical for ultra low noise emf interference and line level noise floor needs to be incredibly love ssd is the ticket. Lastly low latency is a reason ssd's are king.

                    SSD make systems run cooler, have far less line level noise in system, lower overall system latency for general computing.
                    Last edited by creative; 07-14-2018, 10:21 AM.

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