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A Revived Linux Driver To Be Attempted For The ATI RAGE 128

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  • A Revived Linux Driver To Be Attempted For The ATI RAGE 128

    Phoronix: A Revived Linux Driver To Be Attempted For The ATI RAGE 128

    The ATI Rage 128 series was introduced in 1998 while now twenty years later a renewed DDX driver and potentially DRM/KMS kernel driver is going to be attempted for these AGP/PCI graphics cards from the days of OpenGL 1.2...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...28-DRM-In-2018

  • lm92
    replied
    The ATi Rage was used for a long long time in servers, until 2007 or so. Even the ES1000 which is used in more modern servers is basically just a die-shrunk Rage Pro. These don't need to be powerful to display a console but they need to work when you need them, so maintaining a driver makes sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • agd5f
    replied
    The R128 display and 3D hardware is very similar to early radeons. Back in the UMS days I added supported for R128 to the radeon driver:
    https://cgit.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/...h=r128-support
    For KMS, it would probably make more sense to add R128 support to radeon rather than writing a new driver. The patches on that branch would be a good starting point.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    For such a paranoid guy, you're surprisingly revealing of your furtive activities.

    If I had to secure sensitive data somewhere, I imagine one could do worse than renting co-lo at a datacenter in Iceland.
    Some defenses work best in the open, especially if countering them is difficult. I want a world in which every cop on the street knows to "forget the phone." That won't happen if I defend my data in secret and watch the pigs get the same shit from other people's unprotected equipment.

    BTW, fighting against the same Nazis and Fascists my father fought in WWII is not something I even want to keep a secret. Raw video clips of same are another matter. What gets published is carefully vetted after something like that. I make sure everyone knows the raw clips are under (cypher) lock and key so they are not tempted to have a go at another raid.
    Last edited by Luke; 06-12-2018, 03:20 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by Luke View Post
    From back in 2009, I still remember using a Pentium II laptop to rush a bunch of precious pirate radio audio files and photos into encryption ahead of expected police raids that never arrived after the Pittsburgh G20 summit. I took that old PII because it was obsolete enough to be expendable but not so obsolete as to be unable to do it's job. Fast-forward to 2015, and I again had the unpleasant job of emergency encryption of several GB of video files after a skirmish to stop a neo-Nazi convention,
    For such a paranoid guy, you're surprisingly revealing of your furtive activities.

    If I had to secure sensitive data somewhere, I imagine one could do worse than renting co-lo at a datacenter in Iceland.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by DMJC View Post
    On Phone security: Private firms in the USA and the government in China both have the ability to break into the iPhones so that's a useless phone model for security. The same goes for Android. The Librem5 by Purism is the only phone that's going to actually be secure because you can securely encrypt data on the phone using open source encryption tools. Remember that the IOS/Android encryption has already been provably broken. It's not hypothetical, or security based on open vs closed source technology. Both have been cracked. As for drivers for old GPUs: Good. There's nothing bad about keeping support for old hardware working. The important thing is to make sure there's no clashes with modern drivers. Other than that more power to the devs keeping old hardware alive.
    Further note on phone encryption: What I have heard (correct me if you've heard of a better attack) is that all Cellbrite actually defeated in iOS encryption was the code that destroys the filesystem after just ten bad passphrase tries, thus making the usual brute-force and dictionary attacks possible. In attacking an encrypted iPhone, Cellbrite copies the encrypted filesystem out but now has a problem: the decryption for some reason still has to be done on an actual iPhone! Thus a brute-force attack becomes painfuly slow, requiring writing a new copy of the filesystem back to the phone every ten tries. Thus, the rate of the attack is limited by how many MB/S can be written to an iPhone's flash memory. Under these circumstances, even a 4 decimal digit "knock pattern" becomes a real pain in the ass to break into, especially for someone trying to get into 100+ phones after a governmental crackdown on somebody and a series or raids or roundups. If an actual strong passphrase is used, forget it unless you have an attack that does not depend on writing back, such as a real computer emulating iOS and faking the filesystem destruction. Might need Apple source code to write that one and if you are China you are limited to putting someone inside Apple to steal it.

    Android 5.0 and later is LUKS, supposedly the same as a real Linux computer with the same strengths and same limitations. No filesystem writeback limit this time, but you still have all those hashes to compute with the LUKS passphrase hardening. This is much faster though than writing flash, so that knock pattern will fall really quickly. Cellbrite is known to offer the usual algorithms for dictionary attacks etc, which means they probably do NOT have access to some magic Google file (like a vendor-installed Evil Maid Attack) covertly storing a copy of the passphrase for the government. Since cops using Cellbrite are often defeated on Android encryption (presumably by tough passphrases), and this is true even when the FBI gets involved, such a file probably either does not exist. Since I do not know that for sure, there are things I won't photograph with, discuss on, or otherwise commit to an Android phone or any phone. Defense in depth is always the strongest.

    About obsolete hardware: one kind of I do NOT use is anything that needs to be encrypted but either cannot handle it computationally or is limited to software/firmware with known unsafe encryption. On the other hand, hardware that is old but still works for the job I need it to do is never thrown away, and may be used just for its expendablity. Back to gaming cards, while the Rage128 is probably too old for this, you might prefer r600 to today's expensive new card for a portable game box you were taking to a LAN Party in high-theft, high-risk environment. More than once I've been in other contexts of that kind of situation.

    From back in 2009, I still remember using a Pentium II laptop to rush a bunch of precious pirate radio audio files and photos into encryption ahead of expected police raids that never arrived after the Pittsburgh G20 summit. I took that old PII because it was obsolete enough to be expendable but not so obsolete as to be unable to do it's job. Fast-forward to 2015, and I again had the unpleasant job of emergency encryption of several GB of video files after a skirmish to stop a neo-Nazi convention, and had to do it on a second generation Intel Atom. Much faster than a PII, but instead of maybe 50MB I had maybe 5GB to deal with. Still have that PII though: It can still go online and fetch files as long as it does not have to connect to a fat-pig new style website using a fat-pig late model browser to find them, and as long as it does not have to play video to find and download a file. Can probably encrypt as fast as a public wifi connection can get the file, so no problem on that front either. No IME either. Unlike the Atom it also never burned out.

    A mobile version of that old card (plus the slot for it) would have been damned nice in that PII laptop, as I had to used VESA on it and just getting all of the screen in use was a lot of xorg.conf fiddling.

    Leave a comment:


  • nuetzel
    replied
    I can offer a Voodoo5 5500 (2x VSA-100) AGP for free.
    Some Radeon 8500/9200, too.
    Happy retro (gaming)!

    Leave a comment:


  • mulenmar
    replied
    Only computer I still have with an ATI Rage 128-based GPU is an old Dell Latitude C600 laptop, with a Pentium 3. Graphics performance was never great, since it only has 8MB of memory, is a mobile version, and is stuck on an AGP 2x bus.

    I seriously doubt a new driver could be made to outperform what we have now, but ensuring it keeps working at least as well as it does would be nice. They still make decent machines for word-processing or connecting to ancient serial- and parallel-port devices.

    Leave a comment:


  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    Cool fantasy, I guess.

    So, in this dystopian future you inhabit, will you even be able to connect your home-built VGA cards to any display devices? Or are you hoarding CRT monitors, also?

    IMO, instead of assuming what's an easy starting point, why not ask a hardware design engineer? There's a lot of junk in old cards that no longer makes sense, even if you were just building a GPU on a FPGA. Anyway, if you don't care about performance, modern GPUs aren't so hard to build.
    You guys just gave me a great idea for a retirement project - building a GPU out of vacuum tubes, or maybe even relays

    Leave a comment:


  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by DMJC View Post
    As for drivers for old GPUs: Good. There's nothing bad about keeping support for old hardware working. The important thing is to make sure there's no clashes with modern drivers. Other than that more power to the devs keeping old hardware alive.
    Yeah, no complaints on the drivers. In fact, weren't ATI RAGE 128 used as onboard graphics in servers, for a while?

    I just thought kpedersen was being rather absurd. Unless you reset all tech to the 1990's (including fabs), those graphics chips aren't exactly the place I think anyone would start building an opensource GPU.

    Leave a comment:

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