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John Carmack Goes On Coding Retreat With OpenBSD

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  • John Carmack Goes On Coding Retreat With OpenBSD

    Phoronix: John Carmack Goes On Coding Retreat With OpenBSD

    While id Software founder John Carmack has been known for his open-source and Linux interests over the years and even working on Utah GLX back in the day, he just wrapped up a self-driven "programming retreat" where he was using OpenBSD...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...SD-Programming

  • #2
    Is that him complaining about the "unix-ish" world by shooting himself in the foot? If you want to hack away, you use some generic Linux, maybe even Gentoo. There you got all sorts of toolchains, recent compilers with support for everything (also C++14 and whatnot), you got languages, IDEs, editors and many more things.
    OpenBSD is having a focus on security, not on recent software and modern fancy bells and whistles.

    This is like I'd buy a 50 year old truck and complain that it goes so slow on the Autobahn (Autobahn = Germany speed highway auomatically including Autobahn-wide warzone )
    Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Adarion View Post
      Is that him complaining about the "unix-ish" world by shooting himself in the foot? If you want to hack away, you use some generic Linux, maybe even Gentoo. There you got all sorts of toolchains, recent compilers with support for everything (also C++14 and whatnot), you got languages, IDEs, editors and many more things.
      OpenBSD is having a focus on security, not on recent software and modern fancy bells and whistles.

      This is like I'd buy a 50 year old truck and complain that it goes so slow on the Autobahn (Autobahn = Germany speed highway auomatically including Autobahn-wide warzone )
      Not related but is it true that some Autobahns on Germany has no speed limits?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Adarion View Post
        Is that him complaining about the "unix-ish" world by shooting himself in the foot? If you want to hack away, you use some generic Linux, maybe even Gentoo. There you got all sorts of toolchains, recent compilers with support for everything (also C++14 and whatnot), you got languages, IDEs, editors and many more things.
        OpenBSD is having a focus on security, not on recent software and modern fancy bells and whistles.

        This is like I'd buy a 50 year old truck and complain that it goes so slow on the Autobahn (Autobahn = Germany speed highway auomatically including Autobahn-wide warzone )
        Except... there is no real reason for OpenBSD to not have Clang/LLVM well supported by now... since GCC has been shunned.

        Also you completedly ignored his main complaint with Linux... it isn't cohesive like at all.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Leopard View Post

          Not related but is it true that some Autobahns on Germany has no speed limits?
          The key word is "some". In some places, where it is practical to allow, yes is true. But that is together with some of the most disciplined motorists out there, you know, people that don't think they own the left lane...

          Comment


          • #6
            Just a few months ago, I did almost the same project (nn framework from scratch with opencl), I wonder how my code would compare.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cb88 View Post
              Also you completedly ignored his main complaint with Linux... it isn't cohesive like at all.
              It is not cohesive, but when someone tries to do it more cohesive... (cof, cof, systemd, cof, cof)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Leopard View Post
                Not related but is it true that some Autobahns on Germany has no speed limits?
                As was written, in a lot of parts, yes.
                There is a minimum speed, there is a "recommended" speed range and there are a lot of no limit zones, of the road permits (multi lane, relatively straight, smooth surface, no dangerous parts or branchings).
                You can go there as fast as your car can. (Though iirc. above 250 km/h you need a racing license.)
                But it hardly makes sense cause most cars won't go that fast, it's a fuel waste, it's highly stressing, dangerous and in most parts the traffic is either too dense anyway or there are lots of construction sites and speed is limited to 80 ... 120 km/h.
                Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by rastersoft View Post

                  It is not cohesive, but when someone tries to do it more cohesive... (cof, cof, systemd, cof, cof)

                  I find that line that says Linux distros lack consistency a little funny. Windows is famous to break things when a new version is out, but some people only remembers the Linux side of things. Also, most Linux distros deploy the same pack of software, only in different revisions.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Adarion View Post

                    As was written, in a lot of parts, yes.
                    There is a minimum speed, there is a "recommended" speed range and there are a lot of no limit zones, of the road permits (multi lane, relatively straight, smooth surface, no dangerous parts or branchings).
                    You can go there as fast as your car can. (Though iirc. above 250 km/h you need a racing license.)
                    But it hardly makes sense cause most cars won't go that fast, it's a fuel waste, it's highly stressing, dangerous and in most parts the traffic is either too dense anyway or there are lots of construction sites and speed is limited to 80 ... 120 km/h.
                    There is also the "gentlemen agreement" of the German manufactures to electronically limit max speed to 250kph/155mph on their cars. Porsche, of course, did not make any promises :-)

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