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A Look Back At Python 3.0 After 10 Years

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  • A Look Back At Python 3.0 After 10 Years

    Phoronix: A Look Back At Python 3.0 After 10 Years

    This year marks one decade since the release of Python 3. Red Hat's Victor Stinner who is also a CPython core developer provided a retrospective on Python 3 at last week's FOSDEM conference...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-3-FOSDEM-2018

  • #2
    there is still programs
    -> are

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    • #3
      One of my gripes with Python 3 is that the built-in HTTP client is not asynchronous.
      To perform asynchronous HTTP requests you have to rely on a third-party library such as aiohttp.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        One of my gripes with Python 3 is that the built-in HTTP client is not asynchronous.
        To perform asynchronous HTTP requests you have to rely on a third-party library such as aiohttp.
        What's wrong with using aiohttp? Also depending on what you're trying to do, you can always try the multiprocessing or thread libraries. Note the latter keeps your application single-threaded, but from what I recall, it makes memory management easier.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
          What's wrong with using aiohttp? Also depending on what you're trying to do, you can always try the multiprocessing or thread libraries. Note the latter keeps your application single-threaded, but from what I recall, it makes memory management easier.
          Isn't there also Twisted framework for asynchronous HTTP? I like twisted due to how you can use it on many different event notification systems and how many modules can share the same event loop. Of course you have to install it, which shouldn't be that hard to do.

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          • #6
            And still so many things haven't been ported yet from Python 2 to 3...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jpg44 View Post
              Isn't there also Twisted framework for asynchronous HTTP? I like twisted due to how you can use it on many different event notification systems and how many modules can share the same event loop. Of course you have to install it, which shouldn't be that hard to do.
              I think you're right, though I personally haven't used Twisted much. It was way too overkill for my needs, and as a result, needlessly overcomplicated. But, it does seem to serve a lot of purposes that other libraries don't seem to do.
              My main interest with Python+HTTP is WebSocket. Twisted supports that too, but not in an elegant way. It's been a while since I've checked, but there was this very basic library that accomplished WebSocket with far less effort and was only a couple hundred KB.

              Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
              And still so many things haven't been ported yet from Python 2 to 3...
              To my knowledge, there is almost nothing worth caring about that hasn't been ported. If a program or library is still on Python 2, it is likely outdated or too niche.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
                To my knowledge, there is almost nothing worth caring about that hasn't been ported. If a program or library is still on Python 2, it is likely outdated or niche.
                The Deluge BitTorrent client is pretty popular and has not been ported to python 3.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
                  And still so many things haven't been ported yet from Python 2 to 3...
                  That reminds me. I have to evaluate whether it's feasible to port certain intentionally-GTK2 programs of mine from PyGTK to PyGI so I can use Python 3 for them or whether GTK+ 2.x's support for GObject Introspection is simply too immature.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
                    And still so many things haven't been ported yet from Python 2 to 3...
                    We're now well over the peak and Python 2 is sliding down the hill at an increasing rate. I've not come across any packages I wanted that aren't Python 3 compat for a long, long time, but the opposite is increasingly true.
                    Last edited by brrrrttttt; 02-12-2018, 07:25 PM.

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