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X11 Turns 25 Years Old Today

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  • bug77
    replied
    Originally posted by KellyClowers View Post
    >How exactly can you "assure" it?
    *boggle* Have you seen a Windows graphics driver crash?! It is a BSoD. Apps don't survive that.

    >And note that a driver crash in Linux means a kernel panic or at least an X server crash.
    No shit. Happens to mean a kernel panic in Windows as well!
    ATI drivers for Windows had a failsafe self-restart feature for a while. I expect nvidia has had something similar as well. And please note that last I used ATI, it was a Radeon 8500LE on WindowsXP.

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  • garegin
    replied
    with vista they moved part of the stack into userland and made it more resilient to crashes. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/wind...re/gg487368#E2 also as i mentioned earlier, when x.org crashes it takes all the app to its grave. in windows a misbehaving window does not usually crash all other windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • russofris
    replied
    Originally posted by mark45 View Post
    I do not think you understand what I mean.
    Allow me to restate.

    Alt-Tab usage insider Wayland and global keys events exposed to external (not Wayland itself) apps are two different cases, one doesn't necessarily mean the other.
    I don't understand. X11 hotkeys are for applications running under X11. Windows hotkeys are for applications running under Windows. Wayland hotkeys will be for applications running under Wayland.

    So we are on the same page, can you name an application for which you would use an X11 hotkey, and what X11 hotkey you would be using?

    Hitting "Play/Pause/Stop/Next" on an MM keyboard will likely work fine under Wayland in media applications prior to 1.0. I cannot imagine it being overlooked.

    F

    Leave a comment:


  • KellyClowers
    replied
    >How exactly can you "assure" it?
    *boggle* Have you seen a Windows graphics driver crash?! It is a BSoD. Apps don't survive that.

    >And note that a driver crash in Linux means a kernel panic or at least an X server crash.
    No shit. Happens to mean a kernel panic in Windows as well!

    Leave a comment:


  • RealNC
    replied
    Originally posted by KellyClowers View Post
    What, a graphics driver crash (and graphical apps)? Nope, I can assure you that that does not happen.
    How exactly can you "assure" it? And note that a driver crash in Linux means a kernel panic or at least an X server crash.

    Leave a comment:


  • KellyClowers
    replied
    >Your a relic, dude.
    No, actually I am not.

    >We must move forward no matter
    There is a difference between progress and pointless bullshit that removes useful features.

    >how much old folks like you want to remain in the past for nostalgic reasons.
    Not for nostalgic reasons. And I am all for improvements. I am pro-PulseAudio, and cautiously pro-Systemd, for example.
    Also, not old. I am 30, and I never used Linux (or any *nix) till 1999. Hardly an oldtimer.

    Leave a comment:


  • KellyClowers
    replied
    Originally posted by garegin View Post
    ...survive a driver crash and preserve the apps...
    What, a graphics driver crash (and graphical apps)? Nope, I can assure you that that does not happen. Windows certainly does not.

    Leave a comment:


  • garegin
    replied
    i love that the 800 pound gorilla is not discussed. the ability for windows or osx (maybe, im not sure) to survive a driver crash and preserve the apps. modern toolkits have this ability but no-one uses them. this makes the linux desktop an utter joke for the normal user because X.org crashes close all the apps and disrupts the work. and you can't lie to me that they don't happen often because they do. canonical is too cheap to do regression testing so you are probably gonna get at least a few x.org crashes a year.
    i'm sure x11 cranks cannot weasel out of this out easily.

    Leave a comment:


  • mark45
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    The "installed by default" argument is nonsense, because of course no popular distro will expect you to want your volume hotkeys to work without X. So they install by default something that handles them inside X.
    Nonsense is how you redefine my words. If actkbd isn't installed by default I don't care about using it, get it? If still not, please take a hike. I want to base my app on dependencies that are installed by default, which is X11 or Wayland.

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  • curaga
    replied
    The "installed by default" argument is nonsense, because of course no popular distro will expect you to want your volume hotkeys to work without X. So they install by default something that handles them inside X.

    actkbd is hardly a fringe solution comparable to writing your custom kernel modules. It's a portable linux daemon that reads the keyboard events from /dev. If you insist on writing your own daemon, that's the portable way to do so. It will work in X, console, wayland, or even no display at all but still a keyboard attached

    Leave a comment:

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