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Google Enabling PowerVR Rogue GX6250 Open-Source Support With The MediaTek MT8173

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  • Google Enabling PowerVR Rogue GX6250 Open-Source Support With The MediaTek MT8173

    Phoronix: Google Enabling PowerVR Rogue GX6250 Open-Source Support With The MediaTek MT8173

    Building off the PowerVR kernel driver merged in Linux 6.8 and PowerVR Vulkan driver in Mesa 24.0 that are both focused on Imagination's newer PowerVR Rogue architecture, Google engineers are working on enabling open-source driver support for the PowerVR Rogue GX6250 as found within the MediaTek MT8173 SoC...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Patiently waiting for them to support the GPU in JH7110.

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    • #3
      It is nice to read but I'll still walk a long mile around everything that contains PowerVR technology. The many (ongoing) desasters are not forgotten. The generations of useless ARM machines, the many Intel Atoms that were rendered disabled because there was no GPU support, or if, then only for one kernel / X.org release and the likes.
      Stop TCPA, stupid software patents and corrupt politicians!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ayumu View Post
        Patiently waiting for them to support the GPU in JH7110.
        as far as I know it's a fairly low priority, and the gpu thats going to be in the new socs is an even lower one, so I don't think riscv is super on the radar, just close to it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Adarion View Post
          It is nice to read but I'll still walk a long mile around everything that contains PowerVR technology. The many (ongoing) desasters are not forgotten. The generations of useless ARM machines, the many Intel Atoms that were rendered disabled because there was no GPU support, or if, then only for one kernel / X.org release and the likes.
          That's the problem with Linux trying to support every piece of hardware out there: it ends up supporting some of that hardware unpredictably. There is a reason companies like Apple cherry-picked their hardware (back when they used third-party silicon) and didn't allow Nvidia GPUs in the Mac Pro for example (going as far as to blacklist Nvidia's hardware). It's also the reason Google cherry-picks SoCs with good long-term support for their Google Pixel line of smartphones.

          Perhaps the Linux kernel people should demand long-term support guarantees from vendors contributing drivers with closed-source bits (excluding firmware) and blacklisting the rest of the closed-source drives? But then again, you have forked kernels.

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