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Linux Developers To Meet Again To Work On HDR, Color Management & VRR

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  • #21
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post

    Enable, yes. But unless you're running OLED or something with at least 1,000 dimming zones, they still won't be displayed properly.
    Well, s/properly/as proper as the hardware + calibration data permits/, obviously.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by bug77 View Post

      Enable, yes. But unless you're running OLED or something with at least 1,000 dimming zones, they still won't be displayed properly.
      Not Wayland's fault, of course. Still, keep your expectations in check.
      Oh of course lol I have a monitor that supports "HDR" and it looks like shit so it's always off. The living room TV is an OLED that supports HDR and it doesn't cause anything to look bad but it's definitely not great at it either.

      I'm more so interested in the overall color management for color grading software and stuff.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by mxan View Post

        This hackfest is being organised by Igalia, not Red Hat. That said, the original Red Hat-organised hackfest also had people from KDE, Valve, Canonical, Collabora, System76, and several others - you can expect similar names to be at this one.
        That's good to know! General solutions need general coverage, so myopic decisions are avoided

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        • #24
          Originally posted by bug77 View Post

          Enable, yes. But unless you're running OLED or something with at least 1,000 dimming zones, they still won't be displayed properly.
          Not Wayland's fault, of course. Still, keep your expectations in check.
          that's not true, HDR is not about being super dark or super dim, it's about the difference between brightnesses. HDR also allows a much more gradient brightness shift between values, It's contrast that's king, not brightness.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

            that's not true, HDR is not about being super dark or super dim, it's about the difference between brightnesses. HDR also allows a much more gradient brightness shift between values, It's contrast that's king, not brightness.
            I think that's what they were getting at when they mentioned dimming zones.

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            • #26
              This is great to see, as someone who has derped unmagestically with modifying display settings on Linux compared to the ease of using tools like Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) on Windows. (Windows has easy GUI monitor hacking tools?! What?!

              While we hopefully get improved integrated solutions from these hackfests soon for X & Wayland once the nuances of CoCs are figured out…. here’s what a homie’s gotta do for now. Pardon the formatting

              1. List Displays: Use xrandr to identify ports.
              2. Backup EDID: (Gotta always backup yo!)
              3. Extract EDID: Tools like get-edid or nvidia-settings.
              4. Install Tools: read-edid, xxd, hexedit, etc. 5. Edit EDID File: Hex edit ye olde .bin file.
              6. Validate EDID: Check for errors.
              7. Load EDID: Copy to /lib/firmware/edid/ and update bootloader.
              8. Update Bootloader: Apply new kernel parameter.
              9. Restart and Test: Verify changes took effect of course. Have a plan to revert if failed (using sed for example).

              Additional steps are probably needed for Nvidia GPUs with nvidia-settings and nvidia-xconfig.

              Use case: some desktop and laptop 60Hz TN panels seem to OC to 65Hz - 75Hz easily with a VRR range to match. Some IPS seem to have panels range 62Hz-70Hz.

              tinkering with the color range and a colorimeter has been fun also


              Last edited by Eirikr1848; 18 February 2024, 06:35 PM.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Myownfriend View Post

                I think that's what they were getting at when they mentioned dimming zones.
                ofc dimming zones help to make the picture look better, but to say that they are necessary to make the image look "correct" is wrong, I know multiple people who grade their HDR stuff on standard HDR displays without oled or dimming zones.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                  ofc dimming zones help to make the picture look better, but to say that they are necessary to make the image look "correct" is wrong, I know multiple people who grade their HDR stuff on standard HDR displays without oled or dimming zones.
                  I've never been in the market for several thousand dollar monitors so I don't know how they'd be achieving that. Do they use some special LCD that blocks out more of the backlight than usual? Maybe they layer them and use a super bright back light? I'm looking at Eizo's Prominence HDR monitor and it's not revealing any of it's secret sauce. It can use over 400 watts so I'm assuming I'm kind of close.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                    that's not true, HDR is not about being super dark or super dim, it's about the difference between brightnesses. HDR also allows a much more gradient brightness shift between values, It's contrast that's king, not brightness.
                    I know what HDR is about. I was pointing out that if the monitor doesn't have good dimming capabilities, it's impossible to render a SDR window right next to a HDR one. The monitor will just brighten up more than it should.

                    And yes, HDR is also about brightness. Technically it's about the difference between the darkest and brightest shades that it can handle. But since there is a limit to what dark shades the human eye can distinguish, the way to handle more f-stops is to power the black point intensity while pushing the white point higher up.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Myownfriend View Post

                      Oh of course lol I have a monitor that supports "HDR" and it looks like shit so it's always off. The living room TV is an OLED that supports HDR and it doesn't cause anything to look bad but it's definitely not great at it either.

                      I'm more so interested in the overall color management for color grading software and stuff.
                      I was looking up to maybe getting an HDR monitor this year but you really killed the expectation lol, I'm into movies so maybe I'll like it.

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