Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

X.Org Drivers Updated For Old Trident & S3 Graphics

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • zexelon
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

    That (the W510) wasn't that long after the Think brand sold from IBM to Lenovo, however. IBM's PCs were expensive, but built like tanks. They had to be. Secretaries, salespeople, doctors, nurses, executives, etc. are ridiculously hard on equipment. Since then, Thinkpads (and ThinkServers) have joined the rest of the Lenovo line in the PC race for the bottom. Proprietary parts, difficult to replace parts, soldered rather than modular, awful management software, crapware stubbed in the UEFI area.. The Think* line ended up in a slow decline after Lenovo bought them. I won't buy them, and never recommend them to anyone, even for their business line.

    I'm sorry for your company's IT department having to deal with them.
    LOL I am my companies IT. To be honest I don't disagree with you at the low end. My experience has been Lenovo, Dell and HP predominantly. The latter two have horribly imploded at all price points and will never recommend them. The mid to higher end Lenovos still stand up. So far the experience at the low end has also been positive, but it is assumed they are disposable computing devices there...

    Everyone has gone the disposable rout sadly!

    Always open to alternative suggestions though!

    Leave a comment:


  • stormcrow
    replied
    Originally posted by zexelon View Post

    I cannot say enough about Lenovo build quality... I have an ancient W510 that started life as a CAD machine for a construction company... it got accidentally ridden down a set of stairs by a project manager... replaced the screen for 40$ off ebay and its still going today! Up until a year ago it was sitting in my garage running dual CNC table top routers!

    It has not had anything close to an easy life and the battery is totally toast on it, but it still powers on and boots up Ubuntu just fine today!

    As a result my whole company is standardized on Lenovo and for anyone in construction, if you dont by a "tough book" class machine... get a higher end Lenovo... they are almost the same thing!
    That (the W510) wasn't that long after the Think brand sold from IBM to Lenovo, however. IBM's PCs were expensive, but built like tanks. They had to be. Secretaries, salespeople, doctors, nurses, executives, etc. are ridiculously hard on equipment. Since then, Thinkpads (and ThinkServers) have joined the rest of the Lenovo line in the PC race for the bottom. Proprietary parts, difficult to replace parts, soldered rather than modular, awful management software, crapware stubbed in the UEFI area.. The Think* line ended up in a slow decline after Lenovo bought them. I won't buy them, and never recommend them to anyone, even for their business line.

    I'm sorry for your company's IT department having to deal with them.

    Leave a comment:


  • DanL
    replied
    Originally posted by brad0 View Post
    That doesn't mean what you seem to think it does.
    You're probably right, but given the context, I don't give a fsck. Birdies sh!t on my car most of the year. I'm returning the favor.
    Last edited by DanL; 14 February 2023, 08:02 PM. Reason: Clarification

    Leave a comment:


  • DMJC
    replied
    My first laptop was a Toshiba Satellite 1400 with an Intel Celeron 1.2gz CPU. It also had a Trident gfx card. This brings back a lot of memories. I used to run Linux on it back in 2002 my final year of high school.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by pmorph View Post
    It's probably also fun to work on something that you can know well as a whole. Modern systems tend to get so big and complex that people probably often find themselves tinkering with just some subsystems.
    Yeah I agree with that. Modern systems are generally less error prone (or better at handling errors) but when things go wrong, you're often Googling answers for an hour or you're SOL.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adarion
    replied
    I'm happy to see all sorts of backwards compatibility. This is a big strength of FOSS, you can usually also use it on older machines. Saves a lot of electronic waste.

    Leave a comment:


  • pmorph
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    Same reason why people like to keep classic cars or antique furniture - it's not about functionality, and with some of these things being so old, it's not about nostalgia either. I guess for some it's just kinda fun to have an experience from another time period. For others, it's the historical value.
    It's probably also fun to work on something that you can know well as a whole. Modern systems tend to get so big and complex that people probably often find themselves tinkering with just some subsystems.

    Leave a comment:


  • brad0
    replied
    Originally posted by DanL View Post
    Xserver isn't dead, but it's mostly in maintenance mode, and I say that as someone still using it. If you're pointing to this update as evidence to the contrary, then you are living up to your name - Avis, "We try harder... to troll."
    That doesn't mean what you seem to think it does.

    Leave a comment:


  • jimduchek
    replied
    Originally posted by avis View Post
    But isn't it dead, Jim? Cue X11/Xorg haters and "Why are they wasting time with this crap?"
    Man, I got a huge pile of shit from John Carmack (at least it seemed like it at the time, probably wasn't) in like... 1999 for wasting my time working on drivers for the Virge chips, because they didn't support multitexturing. Was in college and it's not like I could afford top line hardware. Still a little salty about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • qarium
    replied
    Originally posted by Myownfriend View Post
    This is one of your sadder posts, birdie (ban evader) lol
    You KNOW that the drivers in question are for 30 year old hardware lol
    we maybe should vote for birdie's account to be reenabled because people are better of knowing birdies real namd and account... no one benefits from the point that he now writes with different account. but to be honest i am and no other person knows why birdie is so angry agaist the opensource and linux ecosystem... he is the voice of the deep state in the tech industry..

    at least we can ask birdie if we want to know how the evil side thinks and acts.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X